Limit DOS application use of resources

This is a stupid question for way too little (but
currently all available) points, about a OS/2 feature
I would like to simulate in Windows NT.

I like to limit the amount of resource usage, in fact currently only the usage of processortime is troubling me, of DOS applications running under Windows NT (64Mb Compaqs >=P166).
Some DOS applications which
must run on some stations, slow down Win32 applications
(e.g. MS Word) considerably.
I tried to invoke them with start command (which I do not
like due to the structure of the CMD files), but with the four available options for processpriority of the start command, I can't get them to stop delaying my Win32 applications.
Even with minimal processpriority they are irritating.
When are these DOS-applications irritating:
always: even doing nothing and waiting for a key to be pressed.

Most probably a third party utility is necessary to reach
my goal. Talk about it.
Someone somewhere said he had an application for it.
An application which passed on the errorlevels of the
DOS application running. Can this be true?

LVL 1
mosiAsked:
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mearley081497Commented:
Kind of funny how you have so much control over DOS in Win95 but almost no control over the DOS emulation in Win NT?  Then again, Win95 is DOS 7.0.

I can say you may change the system setting in control panel to give the foreground application maximum boost (processor time).  I will assume you tried this.

-Matthew
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barthollisCommented:
If you go to the properties of the actual program, there is a setting for idle sensitivity.  You can adjust it to help.  It may not be a complete solution however.

Tell me about the DOS apps.  Were they created in house?  Do you have source code?  There is a patch for Clipper compiled programs to eliminate this problem.  They are notorious for this action.

Of course, the easist way is to exit the DOS programs until needed.  This works in most, but not all, situations.
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mosiAuthor Commented:
to Bathollis:

I except your answer. I didn't think I could use PIF files
because I use LNK files to invoke CMD files, who do some stuff and then invoke the EXE files. But now I found that even then
one can use the PIF files MISC setting for IDLE sensitivity, by
placing it in the same dir as the dos-app. This only
helps a little though. For many applications the problems remain
unchanged.

We use a lot of DOS-apps of all different sources,
among them many Clipper 87 and 5.x made apps.

But I really would like to receive that patch.
Where can I find it (mosi@euronet.nl)?




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