Slackware: Unable to open an initial console

Every time, after installing Slackware 3.3 on my system,
when I reboot, after loading the kernel, it gives me
an error saying "unable to open an initial console" and
doesn't even give me a login prompt. Anyone know what I am doing wrong?
umerkhanAsked:
Who is Participating?
I wear a lot of hats...

"The solutions and answers provided on Experts Exchange have been extremely helpful to me over the last few years. I wear a lot of hats - Developer, Database Administrator, Help Desk, etc., so I know a lot of things but not a lot about one thing. Experts Exchange gives me answers from people who do know a lot about one thing, in a easy to use platform." -Todd S.

nicademusCommented:
I've got something on the top of my mind for that one, because I had it happen once or twice myself, thinking back I think it had to do something with Lilo, maybe you should try, if you haven't already, running a DOS boot disk, then using the Loadlin program which comes with the Slakware Distrib.
Although you need an image file first for this.  So if you can't work around that, try as soon as you have exited the setup, just running liloconfig again, and then lilo  to make sure it has set up the drive ready for booting.  Sorry I can't "answer" I'm just thinking back to when it happened to me...it might come back to me soon...
0
kilobugCommented:
What's your computer? Where did you install Linux (UMSDOS, partition, whole disk, ...)


0
bromone4Commented:
It happened to me once too... let me see if I can remember...
0
The Ultimate Tool Kit for Technolgy Solution Provi

Broken down into practical pointers and step-by-step instructions, the IT Service Excellence Tool Kit delivers expert advice for technology solution providers. Get your free copy for valuable how-to assets including sample agreements, checklists, flowcharts, and more!

sjl100297Commented:
I'd suggest you boot up from a Linux boot/root disk combination. Mount the root filesystem (be it /dev/hda1, /dev/hdb1, etc.) somewhere using the command:
  mount /dev/whatever /mnt -t ext2

Then check /mnt/dev for the following:

console
tty1

They should look something like (with an ls -l)

crw-------   2 root     root   4, 0 Jan 7 14:58 /dev/console
crw-------   2 root     root   4, 1 Jan 7 14:58 /dev/tty1

(the permissions [crw, etc.], owner [root], and date/time don't matter. What matters is that they exist, and have those mystical number pairs.)

Do you have those? If not, try using mknod:

mknod /mnt/dev/console c 4 0
mknod /mnt/dev/tty1 c 4 1

and see if that fixes the problem. (It's possible that the numbers I've given are incorrect; I'm looking at a system that's running a fairly old version of Linux.)
0
jetxCommented:
Do Not Install UMSDOS because if you install it, it will detect a directory in your dos partition which is c:\linux and boot it all up. This UMSDOS is used for DOSLinux. Try installing it without UMSDOS support.

regards,

jetx
0
umerkhanAuthor Commented:
I didn't installed UMSDOS at all.
0
bjacobsCommented:
Boot with a bootdisk and when you get to the spot for extra commands type: mount root=/dev/xxxx where xxxx is the linux partition. It sounds like lilo has the wrong partition listed for linux. Once you're in edit /etc/lilo.conf, fix the problem and re-install lilo.
0

Experts Exchange Solution brought to you by

Your issues matter to us.

Facing a tech roadblock? Get the help and guidance you need from experienced professionals who care. Ask your question anytime, anywhere, with no hassle.

Start your 7-day free trial
It's more than this solution.Get answers and train to solve all your tech problems - anytime, anywhere.Try it for free Edge Out The Competitionfor your dream job with proven skills and certifications.Get started today Stand Outas the employee with proven skills.Start learning today for free Move Your Career Forwardwith certification training in the latest technologies.Start your trial today
Linux

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.