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Adding Hard Disk to Linux

Posted on 1997-09-07
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Last Modified: 2013-12-15
I have used up all the space on my existing HD, and have added another to my system.  I have partitioned with Linux
Fdisk.  I need to format it and get my system(slackware 3) to recognize it.  What are the steps, and how do I complete them...also, does it require rebuilding the kernel?
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Question by:racy
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asmodean earned 100 total points
ID: 1629704
It is very easy to add a second hard disk to linux.
You have performed the first step. I assume you partitioned
the disk as type "Linux native".

Next, you need to frmat the disk. This is done using the
"mke2fs" command.

You can type "mke2fs /dev/hdX" to format an ide hard disk.
X is "a" for the first drive, "b" for the second, and so on.
type "man mke2fs" to see some options you can give it, but it
should do a good job in its default configuration. Be warned that
ALL data on the disk you are formating will be lost.

Lastly, you need to modify the /ets/fstab file to tell linux to
mount your disk when it starts up. You need to add a line
of this form to it:

/dev/hdb2       /        ext2        defaults   1   1

The above line means
mount /dev/hdb2 (the second partition of drive 2) in the
directory / using the ext2fs filesystem. Dont worry about the
last three parameters, they are ok being set to "defaults 1 1"

The above line means that drive hdb2 will contain everything
starting with the directory "/" and going deeper. You will need
to choose a directory to mount your new drive on. A good thing
to do is to move the /home directory to your new disk.


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