• C

itoa function (not atoi)

I'm looking for a standard function to do integer-to-string conversion.  The comp.lang.c FAQ says to just use sprintf, but I'd rather live without that cruft.  I could swear I found just such a function once while browsing through man pages, but can't locate it again.
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dhmAsked:
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msmitsConnect With a Mentor Commented:
Depends on your platform I guess. My borland compiler supports the following function:

  char *itoa(int value, char *string, int radix);

It is documented in the DOS reference, but mentions portability to the win16, win32 and OS/2 platforms. It also says that it is not standard available in ANSI C, ANSI C++ and UNIX.

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dhmAuthor Commented:
Oops, I should've specified unix.  I guess I'll have to ask again.  Thanks for the reply.
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msmitsCommented:
After consulting a UNIX Sun Solaris system I came up with the following two from the atoi(3) man page:

  char *lltostr(long long value, char *ptr);
  char *ulltostr(unsigned long long value, char *ptr);

Otherwise a standard itoa is not very difficult:

  char *itoa(int val, char *ptr)
  {
    int sign = (val < 0) ? -1 : 1;
    char tmp[16];
    int i = 0, j = 0;

    val = sign * val;
    while (val != 0) {
      tmp[i] = (val % 10) + '0';
      val = val / 10;
      i++;
    }
    if (i == 0) {
      strcpy(ptr, "0");
    } else {
      if (sign == -1) {
        ptr[j] = '-';
        j++;
      }
      while (i != 0) {
        ptr[j] = tmp[i - 1];
        i--;
        j++;
      }
      ptr[j] = '\000';
    }
  }

While this may not be the most efficient solution or it may not even work, as I completely did this without a compiler and some test cases, it shows that the base-10 algorithm is not difficult.

Although I agree that a library function would be better, so you don't have to invent and test such trivial stuff...

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dhmAuthor Commented:
Thanks for snooping around...I'd found the Solaris functions too, but they don't exist on the other platforms I compile for.  I ended up just writing itoa, ltoa, utoa, and ultoa:

const char *itoa( int n )
{
      static char buf[32]; /* yeech */
      sprintf( buf, "%d", n );
      return buf;
}

Now I've just gotta find out how to do thread-specific static
function data (on all those platforms).  *That* sort of thing is the hard part on library functions like this.  The logic is, as you say, trivial.
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msmitsCommented:
There are several solutions:
1. require the caller to pass a valid character buffer

2. malloc the space and require the caller to free it

I find the first solution the 'most' clean.

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