DHCP to 4 NICS

We have a router with five NICs, four to our lan, one to the INET.  My understanding is that under Slackware 2.0.31 the DHCP client can talk directly to a raw interface and that the server remembers wich process ID sent the DCHP request so that it can respond to the correct ID, thus allowing a separate set of rules to be run for each interface and not requiring a DHCP server on each net by itself.  Does anyone have any info about how to install and configure?
unitymtgAsked:
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unitymtgAuthor Commented:
Adjusted points to 200
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eckspurtCommented:
This might be easier in the latest Slackware (3.3) distribution as well, but otherwise:

Get the "netcfg" package from the RedHat 4.2 distribution (or just switch to RH 4.2 to upgrade everything at once).  It will let you configure DHCP on a per-interface basis via a Tcl/Tk requester under X.  It's very simple to use, and does track the PID of each DHCP handler as it goes.

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unitymtgAuthor Commented:
This isn't necessarily a rejection, maybe just my confusion.
My understanding is that TCL by default handles devices directly so they are not available to other processes, such as the router.  Does this program instert itself in the streams process?
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eckspurtCommented:
Tcl is a programming language.  Tk is a set of graphics libraries for Tcl.  The netcfg tool is written in Tcl/Tk, and sets up config files for most networking options, including what protocol, if any, should be used to get an IP address from a server (DHCP or BOOTP).

By the way, I've been administrating Unix systems for a LONG time, and I still find package management, when it's at least as good as RPM (in the RedHat distribution), to be very handy.  It speeds up package installation drastically.  The main issue with it being that it involves trusting the package creator more than with sources you have to compile yourself.

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unitymtgAuthor Commented:
Thanks for the help!
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