How do I hide the MSDOS window in a Java exec( <DOS cmd> )?

I'm using Java's Runtime.exec() to set the parameters of a serial port (WinNT40). This works fine, except that the mode.com file needs a command interpreter to run. This too, is o.k., but in the process of running it flashes an MSDOS window on the screen. Does anyone know of a way to hide this  annoying feature?

I'd like this to run without the MSDOS window popping up and disappearing. BTW, I tried removing the "cmd.exe /c" part of the exec command, but that results in the mode command hanging my application and keeping the port busy until I kill it with NT's task manager. I've also tried adding the /q switch to NT40's cmd.exe but the pop-up window persisted.  Maybe this is an MSDOS question...

Anyway, here is the code (JVM 1.1). If anyone can find me a work-around I'd appreciate it!  
 
 

import java.io.*;

public class SerialTest
{
        public static void main( String args[] )
        {
                Runtime rt = Runtime.getRuntime();
                Process p = null;
                String portname = "com1:";
                String cmd[] = {"c:\\winnt\\system32\\cmd.exe", "/c",
                                               
"c:\\winnt\\system32\\mode.com", portname,
                                                "baud=9600", "parity=n",
"data=8",
                                                "stop=1", "to=on",
"xon=on", "octs=off", "odsr=off",
                                                "dtr=hs", "rts=hs" };
                try
                {
                        p = rt.exec( cmd );
                        if( p.waitFor() != 0 )
                        {
                                System.out.println("Error executing
command: " + cmd );
                                System.exit( -1 );
                        }
                        byte data[] = "This is a test of Java writing a
byte stream out of a serial port.".getBytes();
                        FileOutputStream fos = new FileOutputStream(
portname );
                        BufferedOutputStream bos = new
BufferedOutputStream( fos );
                        fos.write( data, 0, data.length );
                        fos.close();
                }
                catch( Exception e )
                {
                        System.out.println("exception: " +
e.getMessage());
                        e.printStackTrace();
                }
        }
}

LVL 1
roy020697Asked:
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eugenemCommented:
Try this:
start /min cmd /c mode.com ...
0
roy020697Author Commented:
Eugene,

It sounded promising, but flamed out when implemented. The start command works fine from the command line, but does not work via Java Runtime.exec( "start", "/min", "cmd.exe" ...). I tried to find the "start" command on my hard drive, but it does not exist as an executable file. I guess it is an internal command.

The windows help example for start says that it will start an application from the command prompt. However, it is the command line interpreter "cmd.exe" which is causing my problem in the first place :-(

Thanks for the suggestion. Too bad it doesn't solve my problem.
0
eugenemCommented:
May be this will work?
cmd /c start /min mode.com
0

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roy020697Author Commented:
That did the trick! I'd give you a better grade if:
1. you tried your solutions yourself first
2. you had the right answer the first time

If you did (1.) first, (2.) would be unnecessary.
Still, my problem is solved. I thank you very much!
0
xjeffkCommented:
nice!
0
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