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Describe buffer format for waveOut()

I successfully used the Win32 API waveOut() call to output some sound to my sound blaster.
waveOutWrite() requires the passing of a pointer to a structure that contains information about the sound to be played. One of the members of this structure is the "buffer":

WAVEHDR WaveHeader;
WaveHeader.lpData = buffer;

I tried specifying something like

WaveHeader.lpData = "balljljsdfljweriwoejrasdafafsff";

and as I expected I received random garbage sound.

I'd like someone to explain how the format of the buffer is interpreted exactly (in 8 bit mode). What does the content of the buffer do to the sound that is output? Please point me to a very specific site that explains the format or explain it yourself. Thanks.
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jawed
Asked:
jawed
1 Solution
 
y96andhaCommented:
Every byte in the buffer is a sample that is output to the speaker. 0x00 is the lowest possible value, 0x80 is the midpoint value and 0xff is highest value.

A buffer containing {0x00, 0xff, 0x00, 0xff ...} will produce a square wave with maximum amplitude.

A buffer containing {0x80, 0x80, 0x80 ...} will produce no output at all.

A buffer containing {0x70, 0x70, 0x70 ...} would optimally produce a weak negative DC.

For a nicer sound than a square wave, try for example to fill the buffer with sine values, like
 buf[i] = 0x80 + 0x40 * sin(i / 16.0 * 2*3.14159)
Playing back this buffer at 8kHz would yield a 500 Hz sine wave with an amplitude of 50% maximum amplitude.

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