Want to win a PS4? Go Premium and enter to win our High-Tech Treats giveaway. Enter to Win

x
?
Solved

2 Network cards in the same machine/trust relationships

Posted on 1997-10-15
3
Medium Priority
?
366 Views
Last Modified: 2013-12-23
I have an OS/2 Server.  Our network is laid out with an OS/2-based token-ring segment and an NT 4.0(SP3)-based Ethernet segment.  I am trying to get a token-ring card and an Ethernet card running in this machine.  I have the token-ring card set up (so far) as Adapter 1, and the Ethernet card as Adapter 0.  However, only one card will function--that card being the Ethernet card.  Any ideas?

That failing--is there a way to set up a trust relationship between the OS/2 domain and the NT domain?  If so, how is it done?
0
Comment
Question by:godmom
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
3 Comments
 
LVL 1

Accepted Solution

by:
sbufton earned 450 total points
ID: 1558554
Have you checked whether there is an IRQ
or I/O address conflict between the cards?

How have you determined that only one card
is working? Are you sure that you have the
required protocols bound to both cards?

As far as I am aware, there is no way to
set up a trust relationship between OS/2
and NT domains. You could try putting one
of the computers in the other's domain as
either a backup domain controller or
additional server, in which case the user
definitions should be taken from the
domain controller - but I have never tried
this, so it may not work.
0
 

Author Comment

by:godmom
ID: 1558555
I'd made sure there was no conflict in the I/O port or IRQ settings, and I checked the protocols.  It seems to work okay now, but of course there's still the problem with the trust relationship.  I think it's something in Microsoft's code: "When encountering OS/2 = barf".
0
 

Expert Comment

by:CTROSE
ID: 10371245
NT must be at sp 6a to work with OS/2
0

Featured Post

Understanding Web Applications

Without even knowing it, most of us are using web applications on a daily basis. Gmail and Yahoo email, Twitter, Facebook, and eBay are used by most of us daily—and they are web applications. We often confuse these web applications tools for websites.  So, what is the difference?

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

This article will show how Aten was able to supply easy management and control for Artear's video walls and wide range display configurations of their newsroom.
Tech spooks aren't just for those who are tech savvy, it also happens to those of us running a business. Check out the top tech spooks for business owners.
Here's a very brief overview of the methods PRTG Network Monitor (https://www.paessler.com/prtg) offers for monitoring bandwidth, to help you decide which methods you´d like to investigate in more detail.  The methods are covered in more detail in o…
NetCrunch network monitor is a highly extensive platform for network monitoring and alert generation. In this video you'll see a live demo of NetCrunch with most notable features explained in a walk-through manner. You'll also get to know the philos…

650 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question