32-bit application call 16-bit dll on Windows NT

Is it possible for a 32 bit application call a third-party 16-bit dll, using Generic Thunk's WOWCallback16....? I can hardly find any example on it either from MSDN or Web.

If it's not possible, are there any other alternatives? The data exchange between applicaiton and DLL are of huge amount.

I would appreciate any hints or details!
DonLiAsked:
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chensuCommented:
Generic Thunks allow a 16-bit Windows-based application to load and call a Win32-based DLL on Windows NT and Windows 95. A Win32-based application can load and call a 16-bit DLL on Windows 95 using a thunk compiler.
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TiutinCommented:
Windows 95 implements a thunking model called flat thunks. Flat thunks allow 32-bit code to call functions implemented in 16-bit code. They also allow 16-bit code to call functions implemented in 32-bit code. Windows NT does not support flat thunks. Therefore, if you use flat thunks, your application cannot run on Windows NT unless you isolate your thunking code into platform-specific DLLs.

Windows NT uses a different thunking model. Windows NT supports generic thunks, which allow 16-bit code to call functions implemented in 32-bit code. Although Windows 95 supports generic thunks, it does not support the underlying process model used by Windows NT. This means that generic thunking code might not work identically under Windows 95 and Windows NT.

So, there seems to be no answer.
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vinniewCommented:
You can't load a 16-bit process into a 32-bit process, so no matter what, data has to cross a process boundary.  That's going to cause extra overhead, always.

You could try to write a 16-bit app that uses a global piece of memory to communicate with a 32-bit app.  That's the fastest way that I've seen/used.  Write the 16-bit app to use the .dll and then set global flags when its time to pass data back and forth.

Just don't use pointers (or convert them yourself) and you should be ok.

V

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