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DNS Round Robin

Posted on 1997-11-07
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Last Modified: 2013-12-23
I would like to have two NIC´s in a Unix Server, configured with two different IP addresses so I can balance net traffic.
However, I need to find a way to configure my DNS servers to alternate, in a round robin fashion, the address they give to the clients when they request a name.

How do I do that?

Thanks.
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Question by:estevaf
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6 Comments
 
LVL 5

Expert Comment

by:n0thing
ID: 1582895
I don't know which version of bind/named you're using or the
platform. But by default, it's Round Robin on Solaris & AIX 3.2.5. I've to rebuild named to disable Round Robin in my case.
Let me know which version & platform you're running your DNS on.
By default, round robin is on on most of the named I've seen so far.

Regards,
Minh Lai
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Accepted Solution

by:
Rodney110897 earned 600 total points
ID: 1582896
The best way to do this is by using CNAME's:

card1        A         192.168.1.1
card2        A         192.168.2.1

unix         CNAME     card1
             CNAME     card2


After refreshing the nameserver check this by pinging 'unix' a few times, it should alternate between card1 and card2.

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LVL 1

Expert Comment

by:Joshua111197
ID: 1582897
Please tell, if the above works. In my opinion the ping would
reach only card1, beacuse this is the first entry thas is
found. But perhaps I'm wrong...
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Expert Comment

by:paulroberts
ID: 1582898
The proper way to do DNS round-robin is to use A records rather than CNAME's, e.g.

server1 IN A 192.168.1.1
server1 IN A 192.168.2.1
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Expert Comment

by:pvenezia
ID: 1582899
Best solution:
*host file*
servername       IN   A    192.168.1.1
                 IN   A    192.168.1.2

*rev file*
1          IN         PTR    servername.domain.com
2          IN         PTR    servername.domain.com

0
 

Expert Comment

by:grantk
ID: 1582900
According to the BOG (Bind Operators Guide):
       hydra           cname        hydra1
                       cname        hydra2
                       cname        hydra3
       hydra1          a            10.1.0.1
                       a            10.1.0.2
                       a            10.1.0.3
       hydra2          a            10.2.0.1
                       a            10.2.0.2
                       a            10.2.0.3
       hydra3          a            10.3.0.1
                       a            10.3.0.2
                       a            10.3.0.3

Note that there are two round robin rotations going on: one at ("hydra",CNAME) and one at each ("hydra1",A) et al.  I used a layer of CNAME's above the layer of A's to keep the response size down.  If you don't have nine addresses you probably don't care and would just use a pile of CNAME's pointing directly at real host names
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