• C

Iterative function

I am trying to figure out an exercise out that tries to take a copy
function(below) and make it into an iterative function of postorder traversal
that does not have any recursion. I think using a stack is appropriate
isn't it? Any ideas?

typedef struct node *tree_pointer;
typedef struct node
{
int data;
tree_pointer left_child, right child;
};

tree_pointer copy (tree_pointer original)
/*this function returns a tree_pointer to an exact copy of the original
tree*/
{
    tree_pointer temp;
    if(original)
{
    temp=(tree_pointer)malloc(sizeof(node));
    if (IS_FULL(temp))   /*IS_FULL is a macro*/
   { fprintf(stderr, "the memory is full\n");
     exit(1);
   }
  temp->left_child = copy(original->left_child);
  temp->right_child=copy(original->right_child);
  temp->data=original->data;
  return temp
 }
return NULL;
}
riccoAsked:
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ozoCommented:
I think using a stack is very appropriate.
(But if you don't want to use the program stack, it may be convenient
to use the tree itself as a stack by adding a parent pointer)
0
kellyjjCommented:
I agree with ozo.  for doing a tree, a stack is a good idea. though  I would say recursion would be faster and less code.
0
ozoCommented:
(since recursion naturally comes with a very nice automatic stack)
0
emmonsCommented:
If you use a stack, are you not going to end up with a program that looks really close to this recursive program, but you will handle the recursion yourself? Will this satisfy the assignment?
You walk down the tree and at every branch you push the reference to that branch onto a local stack, then, when you can't go down any more, you pop it off the stack and proceed with the right branch. I am not sure that I see the advantage of this algorithm over the recursive one iin your example.

I am thinking that you are going to want to do a tree walk and create a tree that has backwards links on it as you go. This would make it so that you would not use the stack (which is really just another way of implementing recursion.) It would be a bit more of a memory hog during the copy, but it would be a completly different mechanism.
0

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