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Floppy Drives in DOS Compatibility Mode

Posted on 1997-11-08
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Last Modified: 2013-12-16
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Question by:tiedeman
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Expert Comment

by:magigraf
ID: 1751530
tiedeman...
Did you try the following:

1) Remove the floppies from your device manager
2) Restart windows and see what does it detects on login
3) If it does not detect your controller and floppies (continue)
4) Go to control panel> Add Hardware> Let it autodetect

Could you try that and post updates?
Regards
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Expert Comment

by:hallstevenson
ID: 1751531
As tiedeman said...  
>>Did you try the following:
>>
>>1) Remove the floppies from your device manager
>>2) Restart windows and see what does it detects on login
>>3) If it does not detect your controller and floppies(continue)
>>4) Go to control panel> Add Hardware> Let it autodetect

The only difference I would say is to restart your computer in SAFE MODE and then remove the floppy drive and the floppy drive controller.

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Author Comment

by:tiedeman
ID: 1751532
I have tried deleting the floppy drive controller and restarting. Windows detects and installs the controller but it shows up with the yellow circle and says the device is not present or not working properly. I get the same result with both the old mother board and my new one.
Mike
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LVL 9

Expert Comment

by:magigraf
ID: 1751533
tiedman...

When you upgraded your motherboard, you didn't change the controller with it right??
What was the system you had, and what is the system you have now.
I need details, so I can figure out what the problem is.

In the mean time could you do the following too:

1) On the desktop, right click on My Computer, select properties, then select the Device Manager tab.
2) Click on the little plus next to the Floppy disk controllers to expand it
3) Click on standard floppy disk controller.
4) Select properties from the bottom
5) In that window (In general, it would say that that device if not working...) that's fine just select the Resources Tab
6) There you would see, on the bottom what devices is it conflicting with (it looks like you have moved your same problem to the new motherboard)
7) I want you to tell me:
   * which I/O address is it using
   * which Interupt request
   * which DMA is it using

8) I want you also in the device manager to click on computer, then select properties from the bottom, and note all the IRQ used and post the list here.

I know I'm asking too much, but this is the only way I can help you.

Regards

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Author Comment

by:tiedeman
ID: 1751534
Both motherboards have on board floppy controllers which is why I thought the new board would get the floppys into 32 bit mode.

Old System: Pentium 90 w/floating point error, intel chipset PCI bus, 8 megs RAM (when Windows 95 was installed), 1.44meg floppy, 1.2meg floppy, Irwin tape drive (later found  not supported by Windows 95 and maybe the cause of the Windows 95 installation problem), Diamond Stealth 64 w/ 2megs VRAM, Panasonic 2X CD ROM, New Com 8X IDE CD ROM, Reveal SC400 16 bit sound card.

New System: Pentium 166MMX, VX chipset PCI bus, 32 megs RAM, 1.44 meg floppy, 1.2 meg floppy, Diamond Stealth 64 w/ 2megs VRAM, Panasonic 2X CD ROM, New Com 8X IDE CD ROM, Reveal SC400 16 bit sound card.

Floppy Controller shows no conflicts and:
DMA 02
I/O Range 03F2-03F5
IRQ 06

IRQ Usage:
00  System Timer
01  Keyboard
02  Prog Interrupt Cont.
03  Com 2
04  Com 1
05  Sound Card
06  Standard Floppy Cont.
07  LPT 1
08  CMOS Clock
09  MIDI
10  Sound Card
11  Modem
13  Numeric data processor
14  Standard Dual PCI IDE Cont.
14  Primary IDE Cont.
15  Standard Dual PCI IDE Cont.
15  Secondary IDE Cont.

I really think the problem lies in the software,I don't rember what the Microsoft tech did but I remember he said "We don't use the floppy drives too much so we don't care how fast they go, do we?" before we did it.

I'm happy to provide any information you need, thanks for the help.

Mike


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LVL 25

Expert Comment

by:dew_associates
ID: 1751535
Mike: When you installed your motherboard, did you format your hard drive and start over or did you just swap the drives?

I also notice that VX chipset you do not have the Intel Bus Mastering drivers installed. Did your motherboard come with any software or software notes?

What type of mouse do you have, serial? or PS/2?

I suspect that your motherboard is either not setup properly or that the required drivers for the chipsets on the board have not been installed.

Please provide us with the exact motherboard manufacturer and board model. This will help us to help you.

Best regards,
Dennis
0
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LVL 7

Expert Comment

by:busuka
ID: 1751536
Hehe, I think your problem is simple, so my guess:
1) enter to BIOS Setup (press <DEL> ...)
2) Check floppies setups (sizes ...)
3) Check in Advanced config Floppy swap. It must be disabled.
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Author Comment

by:tiedeman
ID: 1751537
Busuka:
My BIOS already has the "swap floppy drive" option disabled. I don't think the old BIOS even had that option.

Dennis:
I made no changes to the hard drives when I installed the new motherboard.  I have a serial mouse but I can install the bus port that came with the new motherboard and try a bus mouse from the office if it comes to that. The motherboard is a Matsonic MS-5120 and did not come with any software. The chipset is: Vxpro PCIset. The board has an Award BIOS dated 8-97.
I have to comment that the fact that the same problem exists with two different motherboards makes me think the problem lies in a component which did not change like Software on the Boot drive (i.e. Windows registry), the 1.2 meg floppy, or the ribbon cable.
Thanks,
Mike

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Expert Comment

by:busuka
ID: 1751538
..., or the virus ?

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Accepted Solution

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dew_associates earned 200 total points
ID: 1751539
Tiedeman: Since I've seen this same problem with several different variations, I'm going to post the solution that I would use to correct the problem and install the motherboard and it's chipset components correctly, and do that as an answer. This will require formatting your hard drive, but before you disregard this, read on.

First: Microsoft recommends that whenever the motherboard and/or Bios is changed that you backup your system, format the hard drive, reinstall Windows 95 and then restore the backup over the new install. Here's the reasoning.

During the Windows 95 install process, windows takes a snapshot of the Bios/Cmos setup, config.sys, autoexec.bat as well as a number of other files and writes this info to the MBR, or master boot record, in a temporary file initially. As you move through the hardware setup process and finalize it, windows checks the device setup, notes all successful setups, conflicts and disabled resources and writes this as a single bit in sector 0 on the hard drive. According to MS, this will only be re-written if you change or update the Bios, resolve a hardware conflict or enable a disabled resource. The only caveat here is that windows will not rewrite this single bite if the Intel chipset, whether VX, TX, FX, LX or whatever, has not been initially setup correctly according to an inf file that it can recognize. This is what promped me to ask you whether you received any drivers or software with your motherboard.

You motherboard uses the Intel VX chipset, and as such, that chipsets functions cannot be used until you have added the proper inf file to enable it. That inf file does not come with the retail version of Windows 95, and if the chipset and/or Bios was released after 12/96, in all probability it will not be on the OSR OEM version of Windows 95, which is why MS released the supplement May 1997. Okay, how do we fix all of this and get it working. That's easy enough, but it will take some preparation and some work. Reloading Windows 95 over an existing install WILL NOT fix this problem!

1. You will need a copy of the VX drivers for your motherboard, and these can be obtained at this URL:

www.dallas.net/~ksm/software.htm

Read through the information present and download the driver for your VX chipset, expand it if necessary and save it to a floppy drive. Download the latest one available.

2. Create a Windows 95 Boot Disk by going to Control Panel, Add/Remove Programs and choose "Startup Disk". When the disk is done, find the following files and copy them to the startup disk:

Edit.com
Himem.sys
autoexec,bat
config.sys
**********.sys (your cd rom driver files for both drives
Mscdex.exe
Scandisk.exe

3. Using the MSDOS Editor, create both a config.sys file and autoexec.bat file that will enable you to access either one or the other of your cd rom drives while in dos. Test it to make sure they work and you indeed have access to the cd rom drive when booting to dos.

4. Save off any important files that you may need from your hard drive.

5. Shut off your computer and remove all peripherals except for the floppy drives, hard drives, (1) CD Rom drive and the video card. Yes, pull the tape drive, the second CD Rom drive, the sound card and the modem. You'll see why in a little bit.

6. You may want to use the PS/2 mouse as it will save you an IRQ by using IRQ 12 which is dedicated to a PS/2 mouse only.

7. Boot your system and go into the Bios/Cmos setup. Decide which com port you want your modem to be on and then disable that com port in the bios setup. Also enable the PS/2 mouse if you will be using it. Save your Bios setup and then let the system boot through to dos using the startup disk that you made earlier and then format it using the following command:

     FORMAT C: /S

This will format the drive and then transfer the system to the hard drive.

8. Copy over the config.sys, autoexec.bat, Mscdex.exe, Edit.com, Himem.sys and the driver file for the CD Rom drive your going to use. Boot the system and verify that you can access your cd rom drive and that Himem.sys is active.

9. Run scandisk on your hard drive and make sure you get a clean scan.

10. Install windows 95, but when asked whether you want a typical install or custom, choose custom and then choose carefully each of the components that you want to install.

11. When windows has completed the install and you have gone through the initial hardware configuration and restarted the system, check device manager for any errors and/or conflicts.

12. Now you'll need the driver disk with your VX chipset drivers on it. Using the readme text that comes with them, install the drivers. These should go into the C:\Windows\System folder if there's a problem. Don't reboot yet.

13. Next, go to device manager and scroll down to the floppy disk controller and click the + sign, highlight the entry and remove it. Then scroll down a little further and click on the + sign by the hard disk controller, expand it and remove the controller entirely. This will porbably lock the system. If it does, reset the system. Windows should find the floppy disk controller and install the driver. Windows will also find the master hard disk controller and install the new inf file. If it asks you to choose a driver, either point windows to the floppy with the driver on it or to C:\Windows\System and windows will then load the driver. Windows will then ask to restart the system, go ahead and do it. Windows will then find the Intel primary ide controller and do the same thing. On the next restart, windows will add the second ide controller. At this point, you should have full acces to your floppy drives and hard drives and the correct designations should be in device manager for the Intel IDE/EIDE Hard Disk Controller.

14. Check device manager, there should be no errors or conflicts present. No yellow or red symbols. If there are, then repeat the process above to eliminate them. If everything is okay, go on.

15. Next, add the drivers for your video card. Restart the system and verify that your video card is working properly. If it is, go on.

16. Shutdown your system and check your sound card. If it's plug and play, just install it. If it has IRQ and/or DMA settings, verify what the settings are, write them down and install the card. have your software for the card ready and at hand. If the card emulated sound blaster, it will probably want IRQ 5, Low DMA 1 and  High DMA 5. Reboot the system and let Windows find the sound card. Install the software and the restart the system and verify the settings in device manager. If there are conflicts on the sound card, go to resources and set them manually from the notes you made earlier. Verify that it works properly.

17. Next, check the modem for correct settings, IRQ (if necessary) and port number then add the modem to the system  and then boot the system. Verify that it is set correctly.

18. Now, if you want to install the second cd rom drive, you will have to add a command line for the driver in the config.sys and autoexec.bat files. Once that has been done, shut down the system, add the drive and then restart the system. Make sure you have desginated it correctly as a slave.

19. If you want to try and add the tape drive, you should be able to do that now. It should piggy back onto the IDE (hard drive) ribbon cable. If it's a direct plug in, then you'll have to configure it as a slave (if thats possible) and then add the necessary drivers.

Your last reboot should give you a fully functioning system without any device conflicts.

If you need more, just ask!

Best regards,
Dennis
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Author Comment

by:tiedeman
ID: 1751540
I don't much like the idea of formatting the drive, it's a big one, but this makes good sense to me. I can't try this for a while as I am in the middle of a project which I don't want to risk. I will post the results when I can try it. I have a copy of OSR2 which I may try if I'm formatting drives. Think that's a good idea?
Thanks very much to all who responded,
Mike
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Expert Comment

by:dew_associates
ID: 1751541
Mike, If you have OSR2, it would defintely work better with your motherboard. When your ready, just post that here and I'll give you the URL address for downloading the OSR 2.1 supplement. If you need any help at all, post that fact here and I'll respond.
Dennis
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