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what kind of network am I on? and timed daemon

Posted on 1997-11-11
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Last Modified: 2013-12-23
I have a server S1 on a network at site A and another server S2 on another network at site B.  There are other equipments on both networks.  I'm able to telnet to the server S2 from server S1.

Questions :
(1) Is the network at site A & B called a local area network each?

(2) Are the networks at sites A & B connected via wide area network?

(3) I'm using timed daemon as a master on server S1 and setup timed daemon as a slave on server S2.  I read that timed daemon supports local area network, so will the date in server S2 be in sync with server S1 in the configuration?
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Question by:Rita060297
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n0thing earned 100 total points
ID: 1582948
If it is in another building far away, I'm talking about the physical location. It's probably a WAN. By definition, any devices on the same wire and in the same broadcast domain are LANs. One way to check, if you have a program called traceroute on your system is to try it, "traceroute S2". If it takes more than 1 hops to reach the other system it is a WAN. Even in the same building,if two network are connected via a router, it is a WAN.
For timed, it will figure out the time/delay between your sites and will adjust it properly.

Regards,
Minh Lai
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Author Comment

by:Rita060297
ID: 1582949
I've tried timed daemon but it seems that server S2's date is not in sync with server S1 whereas the equipment on the same network as server S1 are in sync with server S1.  
There's a argument in timed where I can specify network but when I run the timed in server S1, it died.  The command I issued is as follows :
       startsrc -s timed -a "-M -n 192.1.1.123" where 192.1.1.123 is the ip address of server S2.
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by:n0thing
ID: 1582950
Hi Rita,

   While I'm not sure why timed died and why timed isn't in sync.
I would recommend you to try NTP (Network Time Protocol) that we
use here. Pretty reliable and works without a flaw. You could find all the information you need at http://www.eecis.udel.edu/~ntp. On AIX, startsrc doesn't always
do what it's asked. Tyr to start timed manually without startsrc.
But anyhow, I would strongly recommend you to go with NTP. Take
a look at the that Web server and you'll see why.

Regards,
Minh Lai

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Author Comment

by:Rita060297
ID: 1582951
My AIX is running on ver 4.1whereas NTP supports AIX 4.2 and above.  Are there any other possibilities?
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by:n0thing
ID: 1582952
NTP support AIX 4.2 & above ?? I'm using NTP on my AIX 3.2.5
right now. I don't know where'd you read that, but just try to
get the source code & build it on your system. It should work,
I've build it on many systems and hardly have any problems with
it.
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