Installing MFC

I need to install the MFC dlls. They may be in use at that time. I've seen other installation programs asking the user to restart the machine, and the installation have then been completed during Windows 95/NT startup.
How do I do that? Where can I find information about it?
roarAsked:
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Vance KesslerCommented:
I had to do the same thing myself.  Under NT there is a special function to do this (which I'll explain in a minute).  Under Win95 you have to update a special INI file.  I would recommend trying the MoveFileEx call first and if it fails to do the INI thing as a backup.  That way it will work best on both NT and Win95.

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Windows NT:

Use the MoveFileEx function to install DLLs in use.

Windows 95:

If you can't copy over a DLL (a normal CopyFile fails) then you must copy the new DLL to a temporary file.  You then update the WININIT.INI file (in the Win95 Dir) to tell Win95 to replace the old file once it restarts.  There may already be a WININIT.INI file so just use PrivateProfileWriteString() functions.  You basically put in an entry that renames the temp file to the real DLL name.  You do this by putting an entry in the [rename] section of the INI file.  In the form:

DestinationFileName=SourceFileName
 

An example WININIT.INI would look like:
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[rename]
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM\wsock32.dll=C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM\MySock32.tmp
-------------------------

This would replace the original wsock32.dll with my new one which is temporarily called MySock32.Tmp.  Note that you must only use short filenames in the INI file.  You may put as many entries as you wish in this file.

If you want to delete a file put in an entry like this:

NUL=c:\Windows\OldFile.Jnk
 


When the system is restarted, it searches for a WININIT.INI file and, if it finds one, runs WININIT.EXE on the file. After processing the file, WININIT.EXE renames it to WININIT.BAK.

The DestinationFileName and SourceFileName must both be short (8.3) names instead of long filenames because WININIT.EXE is a non-Windows application and runs before the protected mode disk system is loaded. Because long filenames are only visible when the protected mode disk system is loaded, WININIT.EXE won't see them, and therefore, won't process them.

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