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failed driver/file?

Posted on 1997-11-15
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Last Modified: 2013-12-16
while initializing device iso   :error: A I/O subsystem driver failed to load a file in the .\iosubsys subdirectory.  This is the message I get after starting win95 message. Then computer freeze. Only prompt I can get to is C:\>   no A:
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Question by:minns
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by:smeebud
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Have you installed IE4.0???

Will you tell me the vitals your system, ie; cpu make and model,
How much ram , pci, type of mouse, video adapter, network, what
kind of Network Adapter, significant software and anything you
can think of.

There are many variables and we could spend weeks trying to
solve something while I don't know what we're working with. :)
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by:minns
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intel/p233mmx shuttle triton tx motherboard w/512k plb cache
creative sound blaster awe64 3D sound card,pnp
matrox video 4mb
ibm hd
toshiba 24x cd-rom
high res. serial mouse
56k modem no name
iiyama vision master monitor
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by:minns
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using AOL  3.02MSIE                                                                      WIN95(B)
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by:smeebud
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creative sound blaster awe64 3D sound card,pnp
That's you culprit.
1st, chech your device manager for IRQ conflicts, here's a little Device manager helper"
==========
If there is a problem with a device, it is listed in the hardware tree
list under Computer. The problem device has a symbol indicating
the type of problem:

A black exclamation point (!) on a yellow field indicates the device
is in a problem state. A device in a problem state can be
functioning. A problem code explaining the problem is displayed
for the device.

A red "X" indicates a disabled device. A disabled device is a
device that is physically present in the system, consuming
resources, but does not have a protected-mode driver loaded.

A blue "i" on a white field on a device resource in Computer
properties
indicates that Use Automatic Settings is not selected for the device
and that the was manually selected. It does not indicate a problem
or disabled state.

NOTE: Some sound cards and video adapters do not report all
the resources they are using to Windows 95. This can cause
Device Manager to show only one device in conflict, or no
conflicts at all. This can be verified
by disabling the sound card, or using the standard VGA video
driver too see if the conflict is resolved. (This is a known problem
with S3 video cards and 16-bit Sound Blaster sound cards, or
those sound cards using Sound Blaster emulation for Sound
Blaster compatibility.)
When you select a specific device in Device Manager, then click
the Properties button, you see a property sheet. The property
sheet has a General tab.

NOTE: Some devices may have other tabs besides the General
tab.
Not all property sheets have the same tabs; some devices may
have a Resource tab, Driver tab, and Settings tab, or some
combination of these.

At the top of the property sheet, there is a description of the
device. When you click the Resource tab, the window in the
middle of the tab indicates which resource types are available for
the selected device.

The scroll box at the bottom of the contains a Conflicting Device
list.
This list indicates a conflict with an error code.
Note the Use Automatic Settings check box. If Windows 95
successfully detects a device, this check box is selected and the
device should function correctly.
However, if the resource settings are based on Basic Configuration
(where is any number from 0 to9), it may be necessary to change
the configuration by selecting a different basic configuration from
the list. If the particular configuration you want for the device is not
listed as a basic configuration, it may be possible to click the
Change Settings button to manually adjust the resource values.

For example, to edit the Input/Output Range setting, use these
steps:
1. Click the Use Automatic Settings check box to clear it.
2. Click the Change Setting button.
3. Click the appropriate I/O range for the device.

Please see:
http://www.microsoft.com/support/tshoot/w95startup.HTM
                         
         MAKE A LIST AND PRINT IT TWICE
A printout of your system settings is a good reference to keep
handy for hardware troubleshooting. Right-mouse click on My
Computer, select Properties, and click on the Device Manager
tab.
Click on Print, choose the type of report you'd like to print, and
click on OK.
"System summary" prints a report organized by resource type--
IRQ, I/O port, memory, and DMA channel--listing the hardware
that uses each resource. (Double-click on Computer back on the
Device Manager tab to view this information on-screen.) "Selected
class or device" lists the resources and any device drivers used by
the selected hardware. Of course, you'll need to select the
hardware before clicking on Print. And the third option, "All
devices and system summary," prints a system summary and details
for every piece of hardware on your system.

USING THE DEVICE MANAGER EFFICIENTLY
If a hard ware such as a mouse, modem or CD-ROM didn't get
detected automatically and you know that CMOS settings and the
hardware is OK then you could have IRQ or I/O port conflict.
The best way to find out is go to the Control Panel\System
icon\Device manager tab and click print, don't select to print the
whole report because you will end up with 40 pages or more, just
select the IRQ and I/O ports summary, from there you see what
using what.
==========
2nd. disabale PNP in bios and
Remove the card and all drivers and all references to it in your registry and system files.
Then, re-install the card manually choosing your device drivers.

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by:smeebud
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minns,
I've investigated further for the *common* causes of your problem.
#1 is CD-Rom
#2 is creative sound blaster awe64 3D sound card,pnp
#3 is IE 40
--------
So, I suggest first you follow my initial suggestions, but expand it to include Device manager CDROM conflicts.

Also, I'd not be offended if you reject my answer as I was hasty in marking it answered.
That way we let some other heads give you their input.
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by:minns
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I can't get into windows to check device manager. The C:\> is in the ms-dos but I can't even cd\ to A:  or get cd-rom.
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by:smeebud
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I trust you have a "Startup Disk" to boot from??
If not, make one from a friends system that is the same version as your's. You need it now:
------------
Sometimes your system is unbootable.

Create a bootable "rescue" floppy disk that will read your
CDROM.
1. Insert a good blank disk.
2. Select Start/Settings/Control Panel, double-click on the
Add/Remove Programs icon. Click on the Startup Disk tab then
click on Create Disk. When Win95 is done, make the disk
read-only, label it and test it to be sure you can boot your
computer from it.
3. Then, You must create an Autoexec.bat that reads:
A:\MSCDEX.EXE /D:MTMIDE01 /M:15 /E and copy the
mscdex.exe on your disk. The MTM part is mine for Mitsumi, you
have to substitute your CD parameters.
4. The following is a simple AUTOEXEC.BAT File
A:\MSCDEX.EXE /D:MTMIDE01 /M:15 /E
-------------------
5. You must create a Config.sys that reads:
DEVICE=A:\HIMEM.SYS
DEVICE=A:\EMM386.EXE
DEVICE=A:\MTMCDAI.SYS /D:MTMIDE0 [Substitute your
CD parameters here.]
DOS=HIGH,UMB
FILES=30
BUFFERS=30
6. The following is My CONFIG.SYS File. Note that I'm using my
Mitsumi CD-ROM Parameters.
-------------------
DEVICE=A:\HIMEM.SYS
DEVICE=A:\EMM386.EXE
DEVICE=A:\MTMCDAI.SYS (Your CD ROM Driver would go
here)
-------------------
7. The following are the Files I have on my disk.
[(MTMCDIA.SYS), [MSCDEX.EXE], [HIMEM.SYS],
[EMM386.EXE], EDIT.COM, FORMAT.COM,
REGEDIT.EXE, FDISK.EXE, SYS.COM, XCOPY.EXE,
DELTREE.EXE, ATTRIB.EXE, DISKCOPY.EXE,
CHKDSK.EXE, DEBUG.EXE, SCANDISK.EXE, (This Would
Be Your CD ROM Driver)
---------------
To be extra safe, make two boot disks.
A Simple Re-Install (Over Existing Installation)
Note: Always Backup your Registry 1st!!!
WRPV3.ZIP is the Best and easiest Backup/Restore I've Seen.
Go To:
http://www.webdev.net/orca/system.html Search WRP
---------------
This is an option you might want to use if you suspect a corrupted
Registry, Windows95 or Application (FILES). It would be the first
suggestion because it involves the least risk and is the quickest
method to try.
---------------
From dos insert your CD and run from your cd this command...
(setup /d /p f) When setup prompts you for "Full or Custom
Setup", choose Custom. This allows you to have control over
every step of the setup.
This will do a compare and replace missing or corrupted files and
will take you back where you were before the error.
         A Close Up Look At MSCDEX Switches
Provides access to CD-ROM drives. MSCDEX can be loaded
from your AUTOEXEC.BAT file or from the command prompt.
(The device driver that came with your CD-ROM drive must be
loaded from your CONFIG.SYS file. For more information, see
Notes.)
The MSCDEX command should not be used after Windows has
started.
Syntax
MSCDEX /D:driver [/D:driver2... ] [/E] [/K] [/S] [/V] [/L:letter]
[/M:number]
Parameters
/D:driver1 [/D:driver2... ]
Specifies the driver signature of the first CD-ROM device driver.
The driver1 parameter must match the parameter specified by the
/D switch on the CONFIG.SYS command that starts the
corresponding CD-ROM device driver
The MSCDEX command must include at least one /D switch. To
install additional CD-ROM device drivers, specify an additional /D
switch for each device driver.
/E Specifies that the CD-ROM driver be allowed to use expanded
memory, if available, to store sector buffers.
/K Specifies that MS-DOS should recognize CD-ROM volumes
encoded in Kanji. By default, MS-DOS does not recognize Kanji
CD-ROM volumes.
/S Enables sharing of CD-ROM drives on MS-NET or Windows
for Workgroups servers.
/V Directs MSCDEX to display memory statistics when it starts.
/L:letter
Specifies the drive letter to assign to the first CD-ROM drive. If
you have more than one CD-ROM drive, MS-DOS assigns
additional CD-ROM drives subsequent available drive letters.
/M:number Specifies the number of sector buffers.
                    MSCDEX 2
The CD-ROM device driver must be loaded
Your CONFIG.SYS file must include a DEVICE or
DEVICEHIGH command that loads the CD-ROM device driver
that came with your CD-ROM drive. The CD-ROM driver's
command line should include a /D:drivername parameter. This
parameter assigns a driver name (also called a driver signature) to
the CD-ROM device driver.
The MSCDEX command must include a /D:drivername parameter
that matches the /D:drivername parameter on the CD-ROM
device driver's command line. MSCDEX uses the /D:drivername
parameter to identify the correct CD-ROM device driver. The
driver name is usually a name similar to MSCD000. Each
CD-ROM device driver currently in use must have a unique driver
name.
            Limit on number of logical drives
The number of logical drive letters available on your computer can
limit the number of CD-ROM drives you can have. The number of
logical drives is determined by the LASTDRIVE command in your
CONFIG.SYS file. By the time MSCDEX loads, some of the
available drive letters might be used by other programs, such as a
network, DriveSpace, or DoubleSpace.
             SMARTDrive and MSCDEX
If you use SMARTDrive, make sure the MSCDEX command
appears before the SMARTDRV command in your
AUTOEXEC.BAT file. SMARTDrive can significantly speed up
your CD-ROM drive by read-caching it. By default, when
SMARTDrive loads, it checks for the presence of MSCDEX; if
MSCDEX is present, CD-ROM caching is enabled. For more
information, see the (SMARTDRIVE) command.
                 MSCDEX Examples
Loading and enabling a single CD-ROM device driver
This example shows the relevant CONFIG.SYS and
AUTOEXEC.BAT commands for a computer with one CD-ROM
drive.
The CONFIG.SYS file contains the following DEVICE command:

device=c:\devices\cdromdrv.sys /d:mscd000
This command loads the device driver CDROMDRV.SYS, which
came with the CD-ROM drive. The AUTOEXEC.BAT file
contains the following MSCDEX command:
c:\dos\mscdex /d:mscd000 /l:g
This command enables the device driver that has the driver
signature MSCD000. The /E switch specifies that the driver be
allowed to use expanded memory, if available. The /L:G switch
assigns the drive letter G to the CD-ROM drive.
Loading and enabling more than one CD-ROM device driver
This example shows the relevant CONFIG.SYS and
AUTOEXEC.BAT commands for a computer that has two
CD-ROM drives from two different manufacturers.
The CONFIG.SYS file contains the following DEVICE
commands:
device = c:\aspi\aspicd.sys /d:mscd000
device = c:\cdrom\tslcdr.sys /d:mscd001
Each command loads the device driver that came with that
CD-ROM drive. The AUTOEXEC.BAT file contains the
following MSCDEX command:
c:\dos\mscdex /d:mscd000 /d:mscd001 /l:j
This command enables both device drivers. The first driver has the
driver signature MSCD000; the second has the driver signature
MSCD001. The /L:J switch specifies that the first CD-ROM
drive, MSCD000, will be drive J and the second CD-ROM drive
will be drive K.
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by:RHarwood
Comment Utility
Hit F8 when the Starting Windows 95... message appears on bootup.  Try booting to Safe Mode.  If no good then try again but boot to MS-DOS mode.  Then run the Win95 setup program from the command prompt.  You may need to Edit your config.sys and autoexec.bat files to add your CD-Rom drivers if they aren't already there and then reboot to MS-DOS and then run the Setup program.
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by:joe_massimino
Comment Utility
Well?  Were you able to boot in safe mode?  If not, what did you get?

Have your tried a reinstall of Win95 over top of what you have.

What was the last thing done to the machine before this problem surfaced?  
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smeebud earned 200 total points
Comment Utility
From Deja news;
------
Although I can't offer a solution to this problem, I will add another =
example of IOS error.  This happened to me after installing IE 4.0 =
Preview release 2.  It was working properly for a while and then, I =
guess, my computer wasn't properly shut down.  After botting, I got an =
error message that Windows detected some memory problem and mentioned =
that IOS device could not be loaded.  Suggestion I was given trom the =
the continuation of this message was to re-install the system :(

Now, I was asking around and advice I was given was to uncheck all =
unessential devices in the Device System manager (I can boot in the Safe =
mode) and then, by process of elimination determine which device is the =
offending one...
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by:dew_associates
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Hi Minns: Try booting directly to a floppy. If at all possible try booting directly to a Windows 95 startup disk in drive "A", and then run scandisk on drive "C".  If you get a good scan, this will rule out both a PCI IDE Bus failure as well as a hard drive failure.

Did you recently assemble this system? If so, did you assemble all the components at one time and install windows 95, or have you added hardware recently?  It sounds to me to be a conflict TX chipset problem.

Your post would be appreciated!

Best regards,
Dennis
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by:smeebud
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Dew,
Isn't TX or is it LX supposed to be the latest and greatest?
Just curious.
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by:dew_associates
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Bud: The LX is the newest release, but Intel has the next generation due out in April 98. LX coupled with AGP port permits video DMA bypassing the cpu as well as increased bus speeds. The new generation promises 100MHz bus speeds and more.
Den
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by:minns
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Give SMEEbud  125 points, cause I was missing the HIMEM.sys
Give Dennis= dew associates 75 points cause yes I do have the intel tx mother board that now has the patch. Yes I do have bootup disks but couldn't ge anywhere with them. with all your help we are up and working.
                                              Thanks
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