Solved

User Defined Array Size

Posted on 1997-11-15
3
964 Views
Last Modified: 2012-06-27
int * aPointer;
aPointer = new int[10][10];

Why won't it let me assign a multi-dimensional array?
0
Comment
Question by:BabyFace
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
3 Comments
 
LVL 2

Accepted Solution

by:
wpinto earned 50 total points
ID: 1173282
Hi BabyFace,

When new is used to allocate a single object, it yields a pointer to that object; the resultant type is new-type-name * or type-name *. When new is used to allocate a singly dimensioned array of objects, it yields a pointer to the first element of the array, and the resultant type is new-type-name * or type-name *. When new is used to allocate a multidimensional array of objects, it yields a pointer to the first element of the array, and the resultant type preserves the size of all but the leftmost array dimension. For example:

new int[10][10]
yields type int (*)[10].

Therefore, the following code will not work because it attempts to assign a pointer to an array of int with the dimensions [10] to a pointer to type int:

int *aPointer;
aPointer = new int[10][10];

The correct expression is:

int (*aPointer)[10];
aPointer = new int[10][10];

Hope this helps

Wilfred
0
 
LVL 84

Expert Comment

by:ozo
ID: 1173283
line 3: error(3611): a value of type "int (*)[10]" cannot be
          assigned to an entity of type "int *"
  aPointer = new int[10][10];
           ^
//try
int (*aPointer)[10];
0
 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:BabyFace
ID: 1173284
Good job.

Thanks.

0

Featured Post

Industry Leaders: We Want Your Opinion!

We value your feedback.

Take our survey and automatically be enter to win anyone of the following:
Yeti Cooler, Amazon eGift Card, and Movie eGift Card!

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Unlike C#, C++ doesn't have native support for sealing classes (so they cannot be sub-classed). At the cost of a virtual base class pointer it is possible to implement a pseudo sealing mechanism The trick is to virtually inherit from a base class…
Many modern programming languages support the concept of a property -- a class member that combines characteristics of both a data member and a method.  These are sometimes called "smart fields" because you can add logic that is applied automaticall…
The viewer will learn additional member functions of the vector class. Specifically, the capacity and swap member functions will be introduced.
The viewer will be introduced to the technique of using vectors in C++. The video will cover how to define a vector, store values in the vector and retrieve data from the values stored in the vector.

622 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question