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Font problems in a CRichEditCtrl

I am having trouble changing the font in a CRichEditCtrl (created as a child window).  When I tried to use the CRichEditControl's SetDefaultCharFormat() function, no matter what I did to it, the font always remained at an 8 point system font (I *was* setting the mask).  Next I tried to use the window's SetFont() function to set the font.  Now here comes the weird part:

When I use the SetFont() function before I use SetDefualtCharFormat() (which I am still using for other details, such as color) AND I have the mask's CFM_SIZE flag set, then SetFont correctly changes the font to what I defined.  However, there are some weird things that happen in this situation.  Mainly, if I use GetDefaultCharFormat() again, the font name is correct in the structure, but the yHeight variable is some huge number (eg. with a 9 point Arial font the yHeight is 105, with 20 point it is 255).  I am not sure if there is a relation between the two at all, but I assume since it changes with it, that there is.

On the other hand, if I do not set the CFM_SIZE flag, or I call SetDefaultCharFormat() with the other changes (color, etc.) the font point seems to be extremely offset by something (9 point font is barely legible, 15 point is about the size 9 should be).

This problem has been bugging me for about a week now, and I can find no answers on newsgroups or other message boards.  Along with this I would like to ask what the formula is (if there is one) for obtaining the size the edit box should be to allow full space for all the chars (plus a couple pixels above and below).  Please help.

- prodos
0
prodos
Asked:
prodos
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1 Solution
 
prodosAuthor Commented:
Adjusted points to 150
0
 
mikeblasCommented:
You shouldn't use SetFont().

This code works fine for me when setting the default character format on a rich edit control:

      CHARFORMAT cfm;
      cfm.cbSize = sizeof(cfm);
      cfm.dwMask = CFM_FACE | CFM_SIZE;
      cfm.yHeight = 240;
      lstrcpy(cfm.szFaceName, "Arial");

      CRichEditCtrl* pCtrl = (CRichEditCtrl*) GetDlgItem(IDC_RICHEDIT1);
      VERIFY(pCtrl->SetDefaultCharFormat(cfm));

The value in yHeight is in twips.  There's 20 twips in a point. 240, which I used above, is 12 points.

Why didn't you look at the WORDPAD sample that ships with VC++, by the way?

You ask two questions, so I guess I have to answer the second one for free: you'll find that setting the window height of the edit control to 1.5 times the cell height of the characters you're using is most pleasing to the eye.  Don't mulitply by 1.5; do something sensible with integers, like this:

   int nHeight = /* initialized someplace else */;
   int nSize = nHeight + nHeight/2;

.B ekiM


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prodosAuthor Commented:
Adjusted points to 200
0

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