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How change IP address on SunOS

Posted on 1997-11-24
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Last Modified: 2013-12-23
I have:
   SunOs 4.1.3
   /etc/hosts:
ššš127.0.0.1šš hostname localhost

How can I connect this host to my LAN (need change IP address to 192.0.0.1) and start on one nfsd.

I attempt:
    /etc/hosts:
ššš 127.0.0.1šš localhost
ššš 192.0.0.1šš hostname
but do not work, many errors:
    ššš rpc.lockd: Cannot contact status monitor

Thanks
Alex Pas
alex@vidar.ru
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Question by:_alex_
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5 Comments
 
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Expert Comment

by:df020797
ID: 1583021
To chnage IP you must change in /etc/hosts file and in the /etc/rc.d/rc.something file that contains all network info. Then reboot and its done...
(I assumed ya meant SunOS 4.1.X when ya said SunOS)

If ya meant SunOS 5.x, Solaris 2.X you need to this to change IP
Change in the /etc/hosts. Make sure ya change /etc/defaultrouter also so the kernelrouting table is correct. DOnt forget to change in your DNS if you run one and NIS server if you run one.
0
 

Author Comment

by:_alex_
ID: 1583022
>> /etc/rc.d/rc.something
where detaile?
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LVL 2

Expert Comment

by:df020797
ID: 1583023
Gawd... :)
Was ages since I went through /etc/rc.d/rc*  files on a SunOS 4.1.X :-)

Ok.. to make it simple... prompt> grep IP /etc/rc.d/rc.*
Then you ll get a list of in which files the word IP is used...
I think it is rc.nework... but thats to simple... they prolly hided it better... but with this grep you at least ar able to make eductaed guesses :)

0
 

Author Comment

by:_alex_
ID: 1583024
I have only one line in /etc/hosts:
  127.0.0.1 hostname localhost
How can I assigned IP address to host??
If I add second line in /etc/hosts:
  192.0.0.1 hostname
this do't work.
In rc* I can't find IP.


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LVL 1

Accepted Solution

by:
dhughes111797 earned 150 total points
ID: 1583025
You're on the right track, you need to add that second line to /etc/hosts.
However, the 'status monitor not responding message' has nothing
to do with your IP address. You also need to create a file called /etc/hostname.le0
containing the name of the host (same as in /etc/hosts).  And,
rm -rf /etc/sm*/* to get rid of the statd messages.
nfsd's are controlled in /etc/rc.local. You need to add a line
like this:
/export -access=host1,host2,host3
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