?
Solved

Expecting Statement or Type

Posted on 1997-11-24
5
Medium Priority
?
292 Views
Last Modified: 2013-12-03
Hi java Gods!

I am getting several errors specfically an expecting statement error on the subclass message and a type identifier error on the "String.valueOf() line"

Any suggestions?

(I am new at Java)

Thanks.....

Here is the code:

import java.awt.*;
public class Spots extends java.applet.Applet  {

final int MAXSPOTS = 10;
int xspots[ ] = new int[MAXSPOTS];
int yspots[ ] = new int[MAXSPOTS];
int currspots = 0;

public void init( ) {
setBackground(Color.white);
}
public boolean mouseDown(Event evt, int x, int y) {
if (currspots < MAXSPOTS)
   addspots(x,y);
else
returnclass message;
return true;
}
void addspots(int x, int y) {
xspots[currspots] = x;
yspots[currspots] = y;
currspots++;
repaint( );
}
public void paint(Graphics g) {
g.setColor(Color.blue);
for (int i= 0; i<currspots; i++) {
g.fillOval(xspots[i] -10, yspots[i] -10,20,20);
    }
}
public class message extends Spots {
String message = new String( );
Color g = new Color(250,0,0);
set Font = (new Font("Helvetica",Font.BOLD,36));
g.drawString(String.valueOf(message),5,30);
        }
}
0
Comment
Question by:pyramid
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
  • 3
  • 2
5 Comments
 
LVL 4

Accepted Solution

by:
rembo earned 300 total points
ID: 1231139

Well, I see what's wrong, but I'm not sure what you're
really trying to do.

returnclass message;

is not a valid statement.  

Then on 35, you're doing:

g.drawString(String.valueOf(message),5,30);

However, your String is empty.  

When you create a new String, you have to put
something in it.  

Also, why are you extending your applet class?  

I think you want code more like this (It works):

 import java.awt.*;
 public class Spots extends java.applet.Applet {
        final int MAXSPOTS = 10;
        int xspots[ ] = new int[MAXSPOTS];
        int yspots[ ] = new int[MAXSPOTS];
        int currspots = 0;

 public void init( ) {
        setBackground(Color.white);
 }

 public boolean mouseDown(Event evt, int x, int y) {
        if (currspots < MAXSPOTS)
                addspots(x,y);

        return true;
 }

 void addspots(int x, int y) {
        xspots[currspots] = x;
        yspots[currspots] = y;
        currspots++;
        repaint( );
 }

 public void paint(Graphics g) {
        g.setColor(Color.blue);
        for (int i= 0; i<currspots; i++) {
                g.fillOval(xspots[i] -10, yspots[i] -10,20,20);
   }
}
  }


0
 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:pyramid
ID: 1231140
Hi.

I already have that part of the code working.

I am trying to put a test in the code that will give me a message in a template. When I reach over the limit of spots it will write on the applet "Too Many Spots".

any suggestions?
0
 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:pyramid
ID: 1231141
Perhaps I can use import to bring new class in and activate it

any comment??
0
 
LVL 4

Expert Comment

by:rembo
ID: 1231142
Here's a new version that should do what you want:

 import java.awt.*;
 public class Spots extends java.applet.Applet {
        final int MAXSPOTS = 10;
        int xspots[ ] = new int[MAXSPOTS];
        int yspots[ ] = new int[MAXSPOTS];
        int currspots = 0;
        boolean over = false;
        Color errColor;
        Font errFont;
        String errMsg;
        int errX = 0, errY = 0;


 public void init( ) {
        setBackground(Color.white);
 }

 public boolean mouseDown(Event evt, int x, int y) {
        if (currspots < MAXSPOTS)
                addspots(x,y);
    else {
                errX = x;
                errY = y;
                error("Too many spots!");
        }

        return true;
 }

 public void error(String s)
 {
        errMsg = s;
        errColor = new Color(250,0,0);
        errFont = (new Font("Helvetica",Font.BOLD,36));
        over = true;
        repaint();
 }

 void addspots(int x, int y) {
        xspots[currspots] = x;
        yspots[currspots] = y;
        currspots++;
        repaint( );
 }

 public void paint(Graphics g) {
        g.setColor(Color.blue);
        for (int i= 0; i<currspots; i++) {
                g.fillOval(xspots[i] -10, yspots[i] -10,20,20);
    }

        if (over) {
                g.setColor(errColor);
                g.setFont(errFont);
                g.drawString(errMsg, errX, errY);
        }
 }


}


0
 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:pyramid
ID: 1231143
Thank you for helping me! Your code was very enlightening. I knew there was an issue of how Java used boolean. It did confuse me.

Again

Thanks.....
0

Featured Post

Free Tool: Subnet Calculator

The subnet calculator helps you design networks by taking an IP address and network mask and returning information such as network, broadcast address, and host range.

One of a set of tools we're offering as a way of saying thank you for being a part of the community.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Java had always been an easily readable and understandable language.  Some relatively recent changes in the language seem to be changing this pretty fast, and anyone that had not seen any Java code for the last 5 years will possibly have issues unde…
Introduction This article is the second of three articles that explain why and how the Experts Exchange QA Team does test automation for our web site. This article covers the basic installation and configuration of the test automation tools used by…
This video teaches viewers about errors in exception handling.
This tutorial explains how to use the VisualVM tool for the Java platform application. This video goes into detail on the Threads, Sampler, and Profiler tabs.
Suggested Courses
Course of the Month8 days, 9 hours left to enroll

764 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question