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XWindows with Slackware distribution

Posted on 1997-12-04
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Last Modified: 2013-12-15
This is a lengthy question, but I award only a small amount of points for I think that the answer is (or must be) quite easy. If not, I'll raise the amount.
On my second HD, I installed the Slackware Linux distribution (Linux 2.0.0 or so) and then tried to launch XWindows.
I ran xf86config and after answering all questions correctly, tried startx.
However, I got the following error (the XF86Config file is in /home/Chris, where Chris is my login name):

No config file found!
Note, the X server no longer looks for XF86Config in $HOME.

Any ideas here how to permanently make this disappear? I am an absolute beginner at Linux, so please be patient! :-)
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Question by:Christian_Wenz
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by:Christian_Wenz
ID: 1630862
Edited text of question
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by:terrycj
ID: 1630863
Put it in /etc

i.e., as root:

mv $HOME/XF86Config /etc

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by:Christian_Wenz
ID: 1630864
sorry, "permission denied" :-(
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terrycj earned 40 total points
ID: 1630865
you mean you can't become root?

if it's your machine at home, just run 'su' and enter the root
password, then move the file to /etc as i said.

i'm guessing that this is all you need to do.


if you're trying to install XFree86 but don't have root permissions, you can put the file into either of the following
locations under the root of the X installation tree.

        ROOT/lib/X11/XF86Config.hostname
        ROOT/lib/X11/XF86Config

where hostname = the host name of your machine (i.e.,
what you see when you run the command 'hostname').

terry.

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by:Christian_Wenz
ID: 1630866
I can login as "root" (no password required yet), but strangely cannot write to /root. But I'll try your suggestions, please stay tuned.
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by:Christian_Wenz
ID: 1630867
Wonderful. It worked!!! I guess 'su' stands for "Super-User"?!

Thank you very much for your help.
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