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Windows 95 Rebuild

Posted on 1997-12-04
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Last Modified: 2013-12-16
Okay guys an easy one! Can anbody provide, or show me where on the 'Net I may find a step by step guide to rebuilding a Windows 95 PC from scratch, including:-

1. Software and boot disks required, and what they contain.
2. How to partition a drive into at least two partitions using FDISK.
3. Using the FORMAT command and how set up the drive(s) for FAT32
4. Installing Windows 95
5. Troubleshooting when it doesn't work - ie most common errors.
6. Rebuilding using a backup tape, specifically, can you use a DOS backup routine to restore Windows 95 (ie are Windows 95 long file names restored by a DOS backup, when once Windows 95 is up and running)?
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Question by:bigstar
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by:magigraf
ID: 1752288
That fits exactly the criteria of a TECH guy not a litterature..
Come on Bigstar this is too much asking.  If you find something like this, in such details on the net, guys like us would not exist. *lol*
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by:johnt082197
ID: 1752289
I have to agree with magigraf. It looks like you're asking for an estremely large database here!
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by:bigstar
ID: 1752290
Okay Okay, I'll admit it was damn cheeky to say 'here's is an easy one' - it is a bit of a tall order! BUT guys like you two MAGIGRAF & JOHNT must have done this sort of thing. Also it's sort of thing that most PC owners have either to do themselves or get someone to carry out for them at sometime during the life of their PC pusuits. I've recently tried to rebuild my Brother-in-Law's PC, without success (he's pretty miffed) and have the same to do with my own, so I need to know the answer.

I' prepared to up the points to say 150 (but I know points ain't the thing with you guys)and throw down the proverbial gauntlet again!

Otherwise - what do you suggest?
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by:smeebud
ID: 1752291
Start at http://www.winmag.com/library/1996/1496/bonus/win3xa.htm
and download winmags.zip [2500] tips for 95.
Fron there it's a matter of searching.
Microsoft knowledge Base
http://www.dejanews.com/home_ps.shtml [Deja News]
and other places .
As the others said it a tecks database and there is no one places
One of the best is
http://www.annoyances.org/win95/intro.html

I have a lot of material [my database I'd be happy to share]

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by:magigraf
ID: 1752292
bigstar...

You said the magic word "Points are not the issue".
I'm willing to do it for what you offered, but that would take an e-mail and few days to undergo all the possibilities for you.  This is gonna be a BIG text or DOC file.

Let me know.
Regards
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by:bigstar
ID: 1752293
Smeebud

Many thanks for the addresses you gave me, I found many interesting tips for Windows 95, and have downloaded a number of pages for future reference - particularly ANNOYANCES - which is an excellent source of all manner data. There was a refrence to the winmags.zip file you mentioned, but it was not available for download yet - unless I misunderstood the information given.

As good as all this stuff was, I couldn't actually find a step by step guide which included the low level rebuild information - plenty of Win 95 stuff, but no DOS.

Therefore, I would like to take you up on your offer of access to your information, if you'd care to share it.

Maigigraf

Similarly, I'd like to take you up on your offer too - thanks.

My Email is mr.qwerty@bigfoot.com

Look forward to hearing from you both.
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by:dew_associates
ID: 1752294
Bigstar: Do you have the retail or OSR2 version of Windows 95, and if you indeed have OSR 2, is it on a manufacturers cd rom disk or is it a microsoft cd rom disk along with one or two floppies?
Dennis
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by:smeebud
ID: 1752295
Right on Dennis. I presume you mean the txt files and the RESKIT.
Also bigstar, go to,
http://ftpsearch.ntnu.no/
and search and download winmag_tips97.zip
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by:magigraf
ID: 1752296
smeebud: frequent user of winmag??? *lol*
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by:bigstar
ID: 1752297
Dennis - Hi again. I have the manufacturer's version of OSR2 on CD Rom - My windows version is 4.00.950a. There is also a 'b' version too isn't there? Anyway, what is the significance of this and what is Smeebud on about - the text files, RESKIT?

Smeebud - I shall try the URL as you suggest.

Magigraf - Winmag is cool n'est pas?
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by:magigraf
ID: 1752298
bigstar...

Yes indeed it's a good site full of tips and utilities.
( I didn't know that you speak french?? how did you know I would understand??)

What they meant by RESKIT. is the text and hlp files which are on your CD Rom and contains almost everything you want to know about windows.

Regards
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by:bigstar
ID: 1752299
Magigraf - Yes pigeon French is my 2nd language - how did I know you'd understand - you sound educated - well at least as much as wot I am!

So I should explore my Win 95 CD Rom then?

BTW Smeebud - I have finally located 'winmag_tips97.zip' - took some locating - dunno why - downloading as I write this - I shall give it a serious peruse folling this posting

cheers
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by:magigraf
ID: 1752300
bigstar...

Indeed, I speak about 4 languages, french was almost my mother tongue (not being french).

You've got a handfull of info and you won't need our expertise. ;-(
Regards
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by:dew_associates
ID: 1752301
Bigstar: Windows version950a is the retail version (over the counter retail), while OSR2 is the OEM or manufacturers version. Since you have related 950a to your cd rom disk, and unless you specify otherwise, I will presume that you have the retail version available. If you desire, I will layout an easy setup procedure for you to fix your buddies machine, but your running a tab for this one!
Dennis
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by:bigstar
ID: 1752302
Thanks Dennis - looks like I'm running some tab with you already!

What is the version number of OSR2 OEM Version then and how does it differ from my 950a?

Magigraf - 4 languages - wow - and I can't even speak one .... properly!

.....and I think I'm gonna need your expertise for some time to come yet.

I've had a look at the RESKIT Help files that come on the CD Rom, but again, although useful, I cannot find any of the basic low level stuff - eg FDISK, Partition, Format etc
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Too many email signature updates to deal with?

Do you feel like you are taking up all of your time constantly visiting users’ desks to make changes to email signatures? Wish you could manage all signatures from one central location, easily design them and deploy them quickly to users? Well, there is an easy way!

 
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by:dew_associates
ID: 1752303
Bigstar: Aside from the obvious, eg: 950a retail, 950b OSR2, and the fact that OSR2 enables fat 32 over fat 16, the only difference really is that many more hardware devices are supported in OSR2 and most of the files have been updated.

Okay, here goes the beginning of what you asked for, Fdisk and Partitioning:
------------------------------
If you want to repartition a hard disk into one drive, you must first use Fdisk to delete all existing partitions and logical drives, and then create a new primary partition and make it active. You can also repartition a hard disk so that it has more than one logical drive. Notice that, although Windows 95 replaces MS-DOS, the partitions that Fdisk creates are still called DOS partitions.
Although Fdisk is an MS-DOS – based application in Windows 95, however, it can run in a window (a VM).
The Windows 95 emergency startup disk contains a copy of Fdisk, which you can use if a hard disk becomes unreadable.
To configure a hard disk by using Fdisk, complete the following tasks:
 Delete DOS partitions, logical drives, the extended DOS partition, and the primary DOS partition
 Create a new primary DOS partition
 Create an extended partition and logical drives, if you want any

Caution   If you use Fdisk to repartition a hard disk, all the files on the original partitions will be deleted. Be sure to back up all data files on a partition before using Fdisk.
 
To start Fdisk
   At the command prompt, type fdisk
Or
 If you are starting Fdisk from a startup disk, make sure the disk is in drive A, and then restart the computer by pressing CTRL+ALT+DEL. At the command prompt on the A drive, type fdisk
 
When you run Fdisk, the Fdisk Options screen appears, in which you can choose to do the following:
 Create a partition or logical drive
 Set the active partition
 Delete a partition or logical drive
 Display partition information
 
If the computer has two or more hard disks, Fdisk displays a fifth option on the Fdisk Options screen named Change Current Fixed Disk Drive. You can switch to another disk drive by choosing this option. Changing the current hard disk drive while using Fdisk doesn’t change the current drive when you return to the command prompt.
Each Fdisk screen displays a Current Fixed Disk Drive line, followed by a number. If the computer has only one hard disk drive, this number is always 1. If the computer has more than one hard disk drive, the number shows the disk Fdisk is currently working on. The first hard disk drive on the computer is 1, the second is 2, and so on. The Current Fixed Disk Drive line refers only to physical disk drives.
 
Note   If you installed a disk-compression program from Microsoft or another vendor, Fdisk displays the uncompressed, not the compressed, size of the drives. Also, Fdisk might not display information about all the drives used by a disk-compression program from another vendor.
 
Deleting Partitions and Logical Drives
You can use Fdisk to delete partitions before creating a new primary partition. You must delete partitions in the following order:
 Any non-DOS partitions
 Any logical drives in the extended DOS partition
 Any extended DOS partition
 The existing primary DOS partition
 
Important   Back up your files before deleting partitions. If the computer has a non-DOS partition on a hard disk, copy the data files from the partition to floppy disks or a network drive to back them up. For more information, see the documentation that came with the non–MS-DOS operating system or the disk-partitioning program from another vendor.
 
To delete a partition or logical drive
1. In the Fdisk Options screen, press 3, and then press ENTER. The Delete DOS Partition Or Logical DOS Drive screen appears.
2. Press the number as shown on the screen for the kind of partition you want to delete, and then press ENTER.
3. Follow the directions on the screen, and repeat the steps for deleting any additional logical drives or partitions.
 
If Fdisk cannot delete a non-DOS partition, quit Fdisk, delete the non-DOS partition by using the software used to create it, and then restart Fdisk.
Creating a Primary MS-DOS Partition
After you have deleted a primary DOS partition, you can create a new primary DOS partition.
To create a primary DOS partition
1. In the Fdisk Options screen, press 1, and then press ENTER. The Create DOS Partition Or Logical DOS Drive screen appears.
2. Press 1, and then press ENTER. The Create Primary DOS Partition screen appears.
3. If you want the partition to be the maximum size, press ENTER. Then insert a startup disk in drive A, and press any key.
If you do not want the partition to be the maximum size, press N, and then press ENTER. Another Create Primary DOS Partition screen appears.
4. To specify the partition size you want, follow the instructions on-screen, and then press ENTER.
You can specify the partition size as a percentage of disk space or in megabytes of disk space. If you specify a percentage of disk space, include a percent sign (%) after the number.
5. Press ESC to return to the Fdisk Options screen, and follow the instructions on-screen to make the primary DOS partition active. Then return to the Fdisk Options screen.
If you have not allocated all the space on a hard disk to the primary DOS partition, you can create an extended DOS partition and logical drives by choosing the Create Extended DOS Partition option in Fdisk. You specify the partition size you want as a percentage or number of megabytes of disk space.
If you don’t want to create an extended partition, press ESC to quit Fdisk. Then insert a startup disk in drive A, and press any key to continue.
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Here's all that you will need to understand the principles of formatting:
-------------------------
Format
Formats a disk for use with MS-DOS.
The format command creates a new root directory and file allocation table for the disk. It can also check for bad areas on the disk, and it can delete all data on the disk. In order for MS-DOS to be able to use a new disk, you must first use this command to format the disk.
Syntax
format drive: [/v[:label]] [/q] [/u] [/f:size][/b|/s]
format drive: [/v[:label]] [/q] [/u] [/t:tracks /n:sectors] [/b|/s]
format drive: [/v[:label]] [/q] [/u] [/1] [/4] [/b|/s]
format drive: [/q] [/u] [/1] [/4] [/8] [/b|/s]
 

Warning   Do not format a floppy disk at a size higher than it was designed for. For more information, see Format — Notes.

 
Parameter
drive:
Specifies the drive containing the disk you want to format. You must specify a drive parameter. If you do not specify any of the following switches, format uses the drive type to determine the default format for the disk.
If the disk was previously formatted and you do not use the /u switch, the old file allocation table and root directory are saved to allow unformatting of the disk if necessary. If you realize that you formatted the wrong disk, use the unformat command as soon as possible.
Switches
/v:label
Specifies the volume label. A volume label identifies the disk and can be a maximum of 11 characters. If you omit the /v switch or use it without specifying a volume label, MS-DOS prompts you for the volume label after the formatting is completed. If you format more than one disk by using one format command, all of the disks will be given the same volume label. The /v switch is not compatible with the /8 switch. For more information about disk volume labels, see the dir, label, and vol commands.
/q
Specifies a quick format of a disk. With this switch, format deletes the file allocation table (FAT) and the root directory of a previously formatted disk, but does not scan the disk for bad areas. Use the /q switch to format only previously formatted disks that you know are in good condition.
/u
Specifies an unconditional format of a disk. Unconditional formatting destroys all existing data on a disk and prevents you from later “unformatting” the disk. You should use /u if you have received read and write errors during use of a disk. For information about unformatting a disk, see the unformat command.
/f:size
Specifies the size of the floppy disk to format. When possible, use this switch instead of the /t and /n switches. Use one of the following values for size:
 
Value      Size

160 (or 160K or 160KB)      160K, single-sided, double-density, 5.25-inch disk
180 (or 180K or 180KB)      180K, single-sided, double-density, 5.25-inch disk
320 (or 320K or 320KB)      320K, double-sided, double-density, 5.25-inch disk
360 (or 360K or 360KB)      360K, double-sided, double-density, 5.25-inch disk
720 (or 720K or 720KB)      720K, double-sided, double-density, 3.5-inch disk
1200 (or 1200K or 1200KB or 1.2 or 1.2M or 1.2MB)      1.2-MB, double-sided, quadruple-density, 5.25-inch disk
1440 (or 1440K or 1440KB or 1.44 or 1.44M or 1.44MB)      1.44-MB, double-sided, quadruple-density, 3.5-inch disk
2880 (or 2880K or 2880KB or 2.88 or 2.88M or 2.88MB)      2.88-MB, double-sided, extra-high-density, 3.5-inch disk
/b
Reserves space for the system files IO.SYS and MSDOS.SYS (as hidden files) on a newly formatted disk. In previous versions of MS-DOS, it was necessary to reserve this space before using the sys command to copy the system files to the disk. This switch is maintained in MS-DOS version 6.0 for compatibility reasons only.
/s
Copies the operating system files IO.SYS, MSDOS.SYS, and COMMAND.COM from your system’s startup drive to a newly formatted disk that you can use as a system disk. If format cannot find the operating system files, it prompts you to insert a system disk.
/t:tracks
Specifies the number of tracks on the disk. When possible, use the /f switch instead of this switch. If you use the /t switch, you must also use the /n switch. These two switches provide an alternative method of specifying the size of the disk being formatted. You cannot use the /f switch with the /t switch.
/n:sectors
Specifies the number of sectors per track. When possible, use the /f switch instead of this switch. If you use the /n switch, you must also use the /t switch. These two switches provide an alternative method of specifying the size of the disk being formatted. You cannot use the /f switch with the /n switch.
/1
Formats a single side of a floppy disk.
/4
Formats a 5.25-inch, 360K, double-sided, double-density floppy disk on a 1.2-MB disk drive. Some 360K drives cannot reliably read disks formatted with this switch. When used with the /1 switch, this switch formats a 5.25-inch, 180K, single-sided floppy  disk.
/8
Formats a 5.25-inch disk with 8 sectors per track. This switch formats a floppy disk to be compatible with MS-DOS versions earlier than 2.0.
Notes
Formatting a floppy disk
Do not format a floppy disk at a size higher than it was designed for. For example, do not format a 360K floppy disk at 1.2MB.
Also, if you use the format command without specifying the size of the floppy disk, MS-DOS will format the floppy disk at the disk capacity of the disk drive. Thus, if you format a floppy disk without specifying the size, be careful not to use a floppy disk smaller than the capacity of the disk drive.
Typing a volume label
After formatting a floppy disk, format displays the following message:
 
Volume label (11 characters, ENTER for none)?
 
The volume label can be a maximum of 11 characters (including spaces). If you do not want your disk to have a volume label, press ENTER. For information about volume labels, see the label command.
Formatting a hard disk
When you use the format command to format a hard disk, MS-DOS displays a message similar to the following before attempting to format the hard disk:
 
WARNING, ALL DATA ON NON-REMOVABLE DISK
DRIVE x: WILL BE LOST!
Proceed with Format (Y/N)?_
 
To format the hard disk, press Y; if you do not want to format the disk, press N.
Format messages
When formatting is complete, MS-DOS displays messages showing the total disk space, any space marked as defective, the total space used by the operating system (if you used the /s or /b switch), and the space available for your files.
Safe formatting
If you do not specify the /u switch or a switch that reformats the disk to a different size, format performs a “safe” format. It clears the file allocation table and root directory of the disk but does not delete any data. You can then use the unformat command to recover the disk if you did not intend to format the disk. Format also checks each sector on the disk to ensure that the sector can properly store data. If it locates a sector that cannot store data, format marks that sector to prevent MS-DOS from using it.
If you specify the /u switch or any switch that changes the size of the disk, format performs an unconditional format by deleting all data on the disk.
Quick formatting
You can speed up the formatting process by using the /q switch. Use this switch only if you have not received read or write errors on your disk. You can speed up the process even more by using both the /q and /u switches. If you use the /u switch, format does not save the information necessary to later unformat the disk.
Formatting a new disk
When you use format to format a disk that has never been formatted, specify the /u switch to minimize formatting time.
Using format with a subst drive or a network drive
You should not use the format command on a drive prepared by using the subst command. You cannot format disks over a network or an Interlnk drive.
Format exit codes
The following list shows each exit code and a brief description of its meaning:
 
Code      Meaning

0      The format operation was successful.
3      The user pressed CTRL+C or CTRL+BREAK to stop the process.
4      A fatal error occurred (any error other than 0, 3, or 5).
5      The user pressed N in response to the prompt “Proceed with Format (Y/N)?” to stop the process.
You can check these exit codes by using the errorlevel condition with the if batch command. For an example of a batch program that supports errorlevel conditions, see the choice command.
Examples
To format a new floppy disk in drive A using the default size, type the following command:
 
format a:
 
To perform a quick format on a previously formatted disk in drive A, type the following command:
 
format a: /q
 
To format a floppy disk in drive A, completely deleting all data on the disk, type the following command:
 
format a: /u
 
To format a 360K floppy disk in drive A and copy the operating system files to the disk to make it a system disk, type the following command:
 
format a: /f:360 /s
 
To format a floppy disk in drive A and assign to it the volume label “DATA”, type the following command:
 
format a: /v:DATA
 
Related Command
For information about restoring disks after using the format command, see the unformat command.

When your ready for the next segment, let me know!

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by:bigstar
ID: 1752304
Many thanks Dennis for the full reply. I'm afraid it's academic now as my Brother-in-Law (BIL), got fed up waiting for me, took his PC to work and got one of his Guru mates to fix it - which he has done. However, he was unable to rebuild using my BIL's backup tape, (as I tried) - it produced two errors:- 1) the system could not locate HIMEM.SYS, although it was present in the C:\WINDOWS directory 2) a more serious VFAT error. Any ideas on these?

Anyway the Guru had to rebuild using the FDISK, FORMAT, Install Windows route.

Although I say it's academic, I've got to rebuild my machine, so I shall be using your instructions.

I'm a little confused about your answer regarding the various versions of Windows 95. I thought my version '950a retail' allowed fat 32 - is this not the case?

Please post the next installment, as without it I won't be able to post my next response until I have Win 95 and my modem set up.

Cheers

Bigstar

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by:dew_associates
ID: 1752305
Okay Bigstar:  Himem.sys and Vfat. In order to restore from a tape, you would have had to format the drive, reinstall windows along with the tape backup software, closed all running programs except for Systray and Explorer and then started the recovery. However!!!! you would have had to make sure that Himem.sys was present in the root of drive "C" when you did the reinstall and what being called in config.sys so that Windows would write Msdos.sys correctly and then change the config.sys entry to C:\windows\Himem.sys.  This error message occurs usually when one of the following conditions exists: The Config.sys file contains a line pointing to a previous version of the Ifshlp.sys file; or the following Ifshlp.sys statement was deleted from the Config.sys file after reinstalling Windows 95:
DEVICE=<DRIVE>:\<WINDOWS>\IFSHLP.SYS, where <drive> is the drive containing Windows 95 and <windows> is the Windows 95 folder. For example, if Windows 95 is installed in the WINDOWS folder on drive C, the line will read:
DEVICE=C:\WINDOWS\IFSHLP.SYS; or the Ifshlp.sys file is missing from the Windows folder; or the [Paths] section in the Msdos.sys file is incorrect; or a Winboot.ini file from a previous incomplete installation is present in the root folder of the boot disk.

Windows 95 versions:

1. As for the retail versions (A) Windows 95 full version on CD, (B) Windows 95 Upgrade CD and (C) Windows 95 full and upgrade on floppy disk.

None of the above versions allow for Fat 32, only Fat 16. The CD versions include files, especially enhancements that are not included on the floppy version. These version are referred to as version 950. When you apply Service Pack One to any of the foregoing, it becomes 950a.

2. The only version(s) that permit Fat 32 are the OEM versions commonly referred to as OSR2. Even the earlier OEM versions, known as OSR1, were only Fat 16.

So the short version, if you do not have OSR2, your resigned to using Fat 16 unless you can find someone willing to sell you OSR2 (but not a proprietary version from someone else's computer like Gateway or Dell).

Okay, moving forward with your setup!

Right now, here's where you should be.

A. You've Fdisk'd and partitioned your hard drives and created the partitions you need.

B. The first partition on drive "C" has been made active in Fdisk and you have formatted all partitions.

This being the case........

1. You need to create a config.sys file and an autoexec.bat file on your system. If you have formatted your drives, do you intend to loaded Dos 6.xx or bypass it before loading Windows 95.

2. Does your motherboard have a late chipset such as VX, TX, FX or FX, if so, you will need your busmastering drivers for that motherboard and chipset as well as those for the PCI bus.

3. You will also need the driver files for your video card, sound card, modem etc.

Let me know what you have and what you have together!
Dennis
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by:bigstar
ID: 1752306
Hi Dennis

Sorry haven't been back in a week or so. I've had problems logging on to this site - dunno why. Anyway, I've managed to write this message tonight using a friend's PC. So as soon as I can get on EE using my own set-up I'll furnish a full reply. Until then..... bye

Bigstar
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Author Comment

by:bigstar
ID: 1752307
Hi Dennis

Sorry it's a been a while, but have had severe problems getting on to this site - my modem / ISP could not log on without connection breaks or just failure to connect - dunno why!

1. My system originally had just Windows 95 on it, no DOS (other than the version 7.10 that comes with Win '95). I have a copy of DOS 6.22, should I put that on first, are there any adavntages, what do you recommend? My present Autoexec.bat and Config.sys have virtually nothing in them, and I have run without them completely.

2. I have and HX chipset (Gigabyte 586HX motherboard) - I don't know whether it requires any special busmastering drivers - how do I find out?

3. I have 2 sound cards, a sound daughterboard, external modem, Matrox Mystic monitor, Midi interface card (which strangely appears to occupy IRQ 5, yet does not appear in the Windows '95 SYSTEM list, only in the multimedia set up). Only the Matrox card is PCI, all the rest are ISA. I also have an Adaptec 1542CP ISA card (as you know), but for the life of me I cannot get it, or my Exabyte drive to function correctly. I have a CD Rom, Floppy Drive and 2 Quantum Fireball E-IDE HD's. I think I have all I need in the way of drivers etc, but if you could let me know what I should have, please do!

Over to you Dennis.
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by:smeebud
ID: 1752308
bigstar,
You and Dennis have a very good dialog going for you and I thinks it is just for you to Reject my 1st answer so Dennis can give you his full attention.

Me? I'll be watching and learning from the master:))
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by:dew_associates
ID: 1752309
Bigstar: We had the same problem logging in, oh well such is life in the growth world of internet outer space. Thanks for the compliment Bud, I'm far from a master yet though!

Bigstar, if you have a Windows 95 startup disk, you have pretty much what you need to get started sands your cd rom driver. I would load Himem.sys and emm386 from config.sys to get things moving.

HX motherboards do have driver sets, if you do not have them, let me know and I'll post exactly where you can get the current versions. Don't load USB support from the Bios as there are no 950/950a drivers for USB.

It's a shame that you had to rebuild windows 95 given all the work involved with Excabyte. By the way, I've got a slightly used bridge in Brooklyn if your interested? ;-)

Would you prefer a specific load oder for Windows, the hardware and the drivers for your motherboard or would you rather try and wing it?

Let me know!
Dennis
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by:dew_associates
ID: 1752310
Bigstar: We had the same problem logging in, oh well such is life in the growth world of internet outer space. Thanks for the compliment Bud, I'm far from a master yet though!

Bigstar, if you have a Windows 95 startup disk, you have pretty much what you need to get started sands your cd rom driver. I would load Himem.sys and emm386 from config.sys to get things moving.

HX motherboards do have driver sets, if you do not have them, let me know and I'll post exactly where you can get the current versions. Don't load USB support from the Bios as there are no 950/950a drivers for USB.

It's a shame that you had to rebuild windows 95 given all the work involved with Excabyte. By the way, I've got a slightly used bridge in Brooklyn if your interested? ;-)

Would you prefer a specific load order for Windows, the hardware and the drivers for your motherboard or would you rather try and wing it?

Let me know!
Dennis
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Author Comment

by:bigstar
ID: 1752311
Thanks Smeebud for being so gracious. I appeciate all of your input, but yeah, Dennis does seem to be the guy - eh?

Dennis - So you've had problems too with getting on EE? It looked a bit dodgy tonight - didn't really expect to make it - have they severely slimmed down the bandwith or what?

Anyway, I'll be back with answers to your questions shortly, when I've investigated what's on my Win'95 Start-up Disk.

The exabyte's not ready for Brooklyn Bridge yet - I hope. I'm hoping that when I do strip the machine down, and give the Exabyte & the SCSI another whirl - it'll work - a little too optomistic huh?

If you could point me in the right direction forthe HX drivers I'd appreciate it.

Why would I try and 'wing' my motherboard - do you mean chuck it in the garbage? Sorry I'm English - to 'wing' something, means to throw it away?!

Other than that I think I would prefer a specific load order as you suggest.

Back to you Dennis - in the studio!

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dew_associates earned 50 total points
ID: 1752312
Bigstar, what I meant by "wing it" (the context of the comment) was, did you want me to spell out the procedure or did you want to try and do it on your own (winging it alone).

You can find the drivers for your motherboard at this location:

http://web2.airmail.net/ksm/software.htm

After downloading them, expand them as necessary and save a copy to a floppy. If you would, post all of the components such as modem etc that you wish to install so that I can coordinate the driver order for you. Did Gigabyte give you any drivers disks at all???
Dennis
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Author Comment

by:bigstar
ID: 1752313
Dennis - I just wanted to apologise for not replying in a very long time. I'd put off the rebuilding of my PC for ages. I could never seem to allocate enough time to actually set about it, but I do still want to do it. Would you mind - if I reopened this question and asked you to kindly re-reply?
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by:dew_associates
ID: 1752314
Sure Bigstar, just let me know what you would like to do and I'll gladly post it for you!
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by:bigstar
ID: 1752315
Many thanks Dennis - you're a brick - be back soon - promise!
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by:dew_associates
ID: 1752316
Bigstar, The site won't let me post a subsequent answer or you to reopen. Post a question and note that it's to us and then I'll post the whole thing there.
Dennis
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Author Comment

by:bigstar
ID: 1752317
Will Do Dennis - title will be "Windows 95 Rebuild Reprise" - see you there.
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