Advantages and Disadvantages of NTFS vs. FAT on dual boot: 95 and NT 4.0 machine

I am setting up a new computer and have previously had a dual boot machine: 95/NT, since some drivers have not yet been written for NT.

What are the pros and cons of FAT vs. NTFS?  I know that NTFS has security whereas FAT has none, but this is not an issue.  I believe that I can't see NTFS files when in 95.  Does NTFS use storage space more efficiently?  Which file system or which hybrid of file systems should I choose for a 4 gig HD with a 2 gig external drive.  Basic office/finance uses; no games played on system.  I primarily use 95 to access Direc PC, which is not yet avail in NT format. I also need to understand if I should partition the HD for more efficient storage by decreasing cluster size.

Thank you.

Thank you.
jbalashAsked:
Who is Participating?
 
olvConnect With a Mentor Commented:
Hi,

NTFS as you say provides security and a few other things.  NTFS is more efficient for large volumes which may be important for you.  You are right in that you wont be able to see the NTFS partition when running Windows 95.

NTFS is also a 'recoverable' file-system.  Meaning it can recover better from errors than FAT.    Maximum filename size can be 255 characters as opposed to 8+3 for FAT.

As for partitioning, you could partition it into one volume for 95 and one for NT.  The NT one could then be converted to NTFS.  I would definitely partition it, if you want to take advantage of NTFS.    As to how to partition it, you have to decide which OS you are going to use more often.  If your use of Direc PC is greater than your NT apps, then give the 95 partition the larger of the two.

NTFS's default cluster size is 4k, hence it makes better use of available drive space.  NTFS also directly supports compression thereby allowing more files.  

I hope this answers your question.

0
 
jbalashAuthor Commented:
Edited text of question
0
 
jbalashAuthor Commented:
Would like to have known if you need to partition NTFS further.
0
Cloud Class® Course: Certified Penetration Testing

This CPTE Certified Penetration Testing Engineer course covers everything you need to know about becoming a Certified Penetration Testing Engineer. Career Path: Professional roles include Ethical Hackers, Security Consultants, System Administrators, and Chief Security Officers.

 
olvCommented:
NTFS supports volumes up to 16Exabytes

(1 terabyte = 1024 Gb
1 petabyte = 1024 terabytes
1 exabyte = 1024 petabyte )

I would think that the easiest would be to create one partition as NTFS, unless you have some specific reason to partition further (say, you want to split up Data and Applications onto different volumes), you shouldnt need to partition the drive further.


0
 
jbalashAuthor Commented:
Thanks for the clarification and all best wishes for the holidays.
0
 
jhaley111197Commented:
FATs file systems do suppoer 255 characters.
NTFS has built in file-level on-the-fly compression. You can pick and choose which files to compress but you will still be able to open then from within applications (with a small unnoticable performance hit). This allows you to compress certain files/directories that have grown large without having to use PKZZIP. Thus, volume level compression is not needed (or wanted!)

BE FORWARNED! ...Win95 cannot see a NTFS volume nor can NT see a FAT32 volume created with the new Windows 95 OSR2 (which will come with your new computer)

If you have a spare computer around, use it with 95 and connect to directPC and NETWORK it to your new NT machine. The NT machine will be able to see the internet using the Windows 95 machine as a proxy server. (This is very easy to set up)
0
 
jhaley111197Commented:
FATs file systems do suppoer 255 characters.
NTFS has built in file-level on-the-fly compression. You can pick and choose which files to compress but you will still be able to open then from within applications (with a small unnoticable performance hit). This allows you to compress certain files/directories that have grown large without having to use PKZZIP. Thus, volume level compression is not needed (or wanted!)

BE FORWARNED! ...Win95 cannot see a NTFS volume nor can NT see a FAT32 volume created with the new Windows 95 OSR2 (which will come with your new computer)

If you have a spare computer around, use it with 95 and connect to directPC and NETWORK it to your new NT machine. The NT machine will be able to see the internet using the Windows 95 machine as a proxy server. (This is very easy to set up)
0
 
jbalashAuthor Commented:
Thanks for the follow up.  Much appreciated.
0
Question has a verified solution.

Are you are experiencing a similar issue? Get a personalized answer when you ask a related question.

Have a better answer? Share it in a comment.

All Courses

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.