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Need help installing Debian  GNU/Linux

Posted on 1997-12-06
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Last Modified: 2013-12-15
I've currently got DOS 6.22/Win95 installed on my 1.2 gig h/d.  The drive is partitioned into 3 equal parts.  The documentation I've got says that I should have 300 megs free for a full installation of Linux, which I do, though that 300 megs isn't all on one partition. I don't mind formatting one of the partitions I've got now, but I'm wondering if a)win95 will be able to use any of the Linux partition (I suspect not) and b)if I'll have problems with either DOS, Win95 or Linux as a result of having the different OSes installed.

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Question by:megansdad
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bjacobs earned 70 total points
ID: 1630884
a) You are correct, Win95 cannot use any of the Linux partition. Install Linux in it's own seperate partition. Linux can access the other partitions.
b) You will not have problems if set up correctly. You can use lilo in the master boot record to select which operating system to boot. Note that if you re-install Win95 you will lose the Linux partion. There is a Win95 and Linux How-To in the /docs or /docs/mini directory. You can make it simple by getting the System Commander program(about $60) and installing lilo in the root superblock of the Linux partition. System Commander will give you a menu at boot time to select your OS.
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