Solved

'Missing operating system'.

Posted on 1997-12-06
5
216 Views
Last Modified: 2010-04-12
Help !,
I upgraded my brother's computer ( an old 486DX/33Mhz/16MB )
installing a bigger IDE HD (1 GB), also, I installed win95. Everything seemed to be working OK.
When he took it home and turned it on, he got the message :
'Missing operating system'.
Tried several times, same thing, that's all he gets.
I will really appreciate help on this (big?) issue!.
Thanks In Advance.

Efrain R Portales
Fort Worth
0
Comment
Question by:efrain12
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5 Comments
 
LVL 1

Expert Comment

by:ngpudding
ID: 1017119
There're several things you've to check :

1) whether the IDE cables or I/O cards are loose
2) the BIOS settings for your hard-disk(s)
3) if there're 2 physical hard-disk installed, one must be
   set as the master and the other as slave by adjusting the
   jumpers on the hard-disk.
4) make sure the selected hard-disk is bootable.
5) your hard-disk might have crashed, verify this problem by
   using a bootable floppy disk and see whether you can still
   access the hard-disk.


Regards,
ngpudding
0
 

Expert Comment

by:jff
ID: 1017120
If the hardware/cmos settings are okay, boot with the
floppy.  

1. Boot with floppy (floppy w/ system on it obviously)
2. Try and type "C:" to see if you can see the hard drive.
3. If you can change to C: and navigate around, then most
   likely your system files are bad and you'll need to do a
   SYS C: (if possible) to transfer the system files.  You
   could, of course do a FORMAT /S but you'll lose everything
   on the C: drive (ie. try and transfer the system with a
   SYS).
4. If the BIOS is fine, C: is fdisk'ed etc. then you could
   have a bad drive or a crashed drive -- you could try re-
   FDISK'ing it and FORMATing it.  

My guess is that you just need to do a SYS C: from a booted
A: disk and you'll be fine.  

Jason

Jason
0
 

Expert Comment

by:jff
ID: 1017121
If the hardware/cmos settings are okay, boot with the
floppy.  

1. Boot with floppy (floppy w/ system on it obviously)
2. Try and type "C:" to see if you can see the hard drive.
3. If you can change to C: and navigate around, then most
   likely your system files are bad and you'll need to do a
   SYS C: (if possible) to transfer the system files.  You
   could, of course do a FORMAT /S but you'll lose everything
   on the C: drive (ie. try and transfer the system with a
   SYS).
4. If the BIOS is fine, C: is fdisk'ed etc. then you could
   have a bad drive or a crashed drive -- you could try re-
   FDISK'ing it and FORMATing it.  

My guess is that you just need to do a SYS C: from a booted
A: disk and you'll be fine.  

Jason

Jason
0
 
LVL 1

Accepted Solution

by:
robandrw earned 10 total points
ID: 1017122
Also,
make the sure that the partition you installed Win95 is marked as the active partition. You can do this by booting of a floppy and running fdisk. When you view partition info there should be an 'A' next to the active partition. If not, make the partition active.
0
 

Author Comment

by:efrain12
ID: 1017123
Today I'm going to work on that computer, will apply
your suggestion/advice. Let you know if it worked.
Thanks.

Efrain.
0

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