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Newbie: Linux+Win95 partitions?

Posted on 1997-12-07
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Last Modified: 2013-12-15
I am about to install Linux on an 8gig IDE hard drive. My
plan is to let Win95 occupy a small C drive all by itself,
with a D for apps and software, and E for everything else.
Next would come Linux's root, swap, /usr, and /home. My
qestion regards the Linux partitions. From what I have read,
applications (like Netscape) will install themselves to
/usr/local. Is this correct? If so, I will make a fairly
large /usr partition.

I figure that most data would reside on the E drive so that
it can be accessed with both OSes. In that case, I'm looking
at the partitions being: C small, D large, E large, / small,
swap 64MB, /usr large, /home small. Does this sound right?
Any recommendations on partition size?
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Question by:pretzelgod
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7 Comments
 
LVL 51

Expert Comment

by:ahoffmann
ID: 1630907
So you desided that linux should be placed in extended partition F: with four partitions: / swap /usr /home.
Keep in mind that you will have less problems (which problems? see various HOWTOs and FAQs) if your root (/) partition is inside the 1024 MB boundary.
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Accepted Solution

by:
jlms earned 300 total points
ID: 1630908
About Linux: in reality you don't need to make partitions, maybe only one for Linux and another one for swap and that is it.

There are as many people in favor as against the one partition approach, so I truly believe that as long as you fix a policy to distribute your data and applications in your disk it does not matter if you have one or many partitions. If the size of you files is known in davance it make sense to define partitions with different characteristics, but usually that is not the case.

To have one partition has the advantage that you will be faced less often with "file system full" messages.


About the applications: most of the time you can decide where to put any software, it makes sense sometimes to put in different places, but if you have only one disk, wherever you put it, if the disk crashes your info is lost.

I suggest:
4 partitions:
1.-Big for W95 and apllication software.
2.-Big for common data.
3.-Linux (all directories).
4.-Swap.

  Pay attention to the comment of pretzelgod, life will be easier if you can install linux in the first 1024 cylinders.

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LVL 51

Expert Comment

by:ahoffmann
ID: 1630909
jlms,
I cannot agree with your one-linux-partition solution. I would also not suggest using more partitions, it depends on the installation you are planing.

If you decide just to have linux running anyhow, don't upgrade to a newer kernel and install few applications, one partition is the solution.
If you want to have linux easily be upgraded, at least you application should be in its own partition. /usr as a partition makes also sense.
jlms, your marked "file system full" as an disadvantage in case of multiple partitions. I would say it's an advantage, because it makes the system more stable. I.g. the data partitions (/usr /home etc.) run out of disk space. If this happens on a single partition containing your OS, it may result in a crash, loss of data, etc. etc. . If it just happens on a data partition you may be lucky still to have a running OS. Keep in mind that UNIX (root only) can write up to 110% of the disk.

Now general rules above, just a few hints about planing partitions.
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Author Comment

by:pretzelgod
ID: 1630910
Thanks for the responses. I think I'll go with one main Linux partition and the swap. This is only my first time dealing with Linux, and this seems like a simpler solution to my problem.

Once again, thanks to both ahoffman and jlms.
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Author Comment

by:pretzelgod
ID: 1630911
Okay, I think I should use LOADLIN to avoid the 1024 cylinder problem. I can setup multiple configurations in the autoexec.bat and config.sys files allowing me to boot straight to linux or win95 depending on my needs. Are there any disadvantages to this that I should watch out for?
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LVL 4

Expert Comment

by:jlms
ID: 1630912
As you mention, any UNIX can be programmed to have a margin of 10%, when this margin is reached no user, but the super user, can write anymore, so the system is not compromised unless is the superuser or processes belonging to him the ones that are stuffing the disk.

  As I said, I have seen as many positions in pro or against each aproach, including Sun (another UNIX) experienced Engineers that write books about tunning and performance.

  Now if one has huge files one has to choose the option that gives you the more space, been this the 1 partition policy.

  For a newbie that just wants to begin to explore Linux I think one or two partitions (one for swap) is also the best aproach.

  For old gurus everyone has his/her own way :)

0
 

Expert Comment

by:4euphoria
ID: 1630913
JLMS- I'm interested in linux partitioning, ect, could you e-mail me: 4euphoria@mailexcite.com or ICQ #7205094  Thanks


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