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Works 3.0 reinstallation dilemma

Posted on 1997-12-08
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Last Modified: 2013-12-16

Following a reg.dat corruption, I need to reinstall Works 3.0. (I'm using Windows 3.11 on a Pentium95.
  When I run the install program either from my CD-Rom E: drive, or from the setup in the MSworks directory on my c: drive, I get an error message very early on in the process that it can't open the D:_mssetup.exe file. Obviously it can't, because I don't have a d: drive.  How do I get the setup program to look for that file either on my e: drive or my c: drive, on both of which drives it exists!!!
  Thanks
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Question by:stevemr120897
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by:magigraf
ID: 1776402
stevemr...

Could you do me a favor, and use the SEARCH to find any INI files under windows or windows\system directory that has any relation with Microsoft Works?? (e.g.: Search for MSW*.* or WOR*.*)

When you said uninstalled it, was it by just deleteting the directory??  If it's the case, chances are that under your windows and windows\system directory, you still have some files left over from the previous installation. We will address that later.

Now why you do not have a D drive and you got an E drive??
What caused that jump?? from C to E??

Could you feedbak?
Regards
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by:stevemr120897
ID: 1776403
magigrat:
   1.   I ran serarch -- the only ini files are msworks3.ini and setup.ini.   I looked at the msworks3.ini and there was a single reference to my old d: drive for the mshelp file, which I have now changed to the e: drive.  But that did not cure the problem.
   I spoke inadvertantly about my d: drive.  I do have one, but its not the CD-Rom drive. My D: drive is the compressed result of running doublespace on my c: drive.  At the time I had to change some designations on some programs from the D: to E: so they would know where the CD-rom drive was.  However, this was two years ago, and there has never been a problem with MSWorks till now.
  I have not "uninstalled" MsWorks.  I have been trying to "re-install" it, which is one of the options on the setup program.  I am nervous about doing a complete uninstall and reinstall in case the setup program persists in looking for the d: drive.
  I still can't figure out what is making it look to a d: drive, particularly when I run the setup program from the CD-rom IN my e: drive.
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magigraf earned 100 total points
ID: 1776404
Stevemr...

At that stage I could post as an answer:
Well the best way to do it right now is to UNINSTALL then REINSTALL.  You see it's very tricky, the same scenario even more picky is MS Office which needs the CD to get UNINSTALLED.

We are facing here almost the same problem, during the setup of MsWorks it write in Hexadecimal within a file where did it got installed from for future references.  It's common currency with these programs.  You could stay months trying to troubleshoot it without success, while it is few steps away from you.

Just make sure that all your files are not under the MS WOrks directory before uninstalling it.  Then proceed with a fresh install.  I would like to point also that this should be a habit when performing any upgrade of any sort of application (Uninstall the Reinstall) Unless precisely asked not to.

Hope this will solve your problem and get you up and running.
If you need further help, let me know!
Regards
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