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Finger??????????

Posted on 1997-12-09
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Last Modified: 2010-04-21
Is there any UNIX command to tell me who has ever used
the command "finger" to finger me???

Someone told me there is one command in /usr, but i
didn't find it.
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Question by:lukeyz
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ahoffmann earned 50 total points
ID: 2008244
Use tcp_wrapper in /etc/inetd.conf for finger service.
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by:lukeyz
ID: 2008245
excuse me, i am still not very clear about how to use
this Use tcp_wrapper or /etc/inetd.conf

one thing i want to clarify is that i am just an ordinary user
not administrator, maybe i can't modify some files in certain
directories in our UNIX system.

many thanks
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Expert Comment

by:ahoffmann
ID: 2008246
Yes, you must be root to modify /etc/inetd.conf (if your system is setup properly). Because finger functionality is implemented via port 79 (secure/trusted port), accounting can only be done by the service (fingerd, tcpd, tcp_wrapper) for this port.
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