Solved

SCSI drive reporting wrong ID

Posted on 1997-12-11
2
318 Views
Last Modified: 2008-02-01
Can someone please help with the following situation:
We have a Dell OmniPlex 590.
Sco Unix System V, Version 3.2.4.
One internal 500MB DEC SCSI drive (ID 0) on a built in NCR SCSI adapter.
One external HP DAT Tape drive (ID 1)
Three external SCSI drives (ID 4=2GB, ID 5=1GB, ID 6=1 GB)
    The tape drive and the three external drives are on an     Adaptec 2940 SCSI adapter.
The 2GB external replaced a 1GB external at the same position on the chain and at the same ID (4).
When we boot, the NCR SCSI BIOS now reports the internal drive as ID 4, even though the jumpers are set to ID 0. No modifications were made to this drive, the PC case wasn't even opened. The Adaptec still reports all of the other drives correctly (IDs 1, 4, 5 & 6) when viewed in the
SCSI Select utility during boot up.
However, UNIX now fails to boot and gives the following message:
PANIC: srmountfun - error 6 mounting rootdev hd (1/40).
It then tries to dump pages, fails and puts me at the "safe to power down or reboot" message. No previous versions of UNIX worked (unix.old, etc.). It will however boot into DOS.
We reformatted the internal drive, and attempted to configure the internal drive and restore the root file system from our last full backup using CTAR. However when you choose the internal drive (/dev/rhd00) it says that there is no such device available. I am assuming this error is because the drive is assigned as ID 4 instead of the correct ID 0.
I also tried disconnected all of the external drives and it still gets assigned the ID 4.
Does anyone know why this is happening and how I can remedy the situation?
Dell tech support seems to think the drive itself is bad. Before we order a replacement I just want to make sure I covered all of the bases.

Sorry this is so long but I wanted to include as much info as possible.
Any advice will be greatly appreciated.

Thank you.

0
Comment
Question by:caspian121197
2 Comments
 

Expert Comment

by:syed121797
Comment Utility
go to scsi select and make sure you selected the drive with id 0  as your boot drive
0
 
LVL 1

Accepted Solution

by:
cemaylor earned 50 total points
Comment Utility
Not sure that this will help, however as you have a different type of drive in what seems now to be an older system, the problem could easily reside in a termination issue.

Many of the newer drives handle termination differently than old drives.

It appears that you have checked most or all of the options quite thoroughly.  So far as disconnecting the external chain, you want to be certain that the last drive in the chain is terminated, and this is likely not the case.

I would suggest you disconnect the external drives, terminate the internal drive which should show as ID 0.

If the system now boots, the drive is most likely OK.

If the system still does not boot, I would suggest you check the cables.  Replace the internal SCSI cable with a one drive cable, ensuring that pin one is aligned correctly (of course).  

If the system still does not boot, then odds are the drive is toast, or at least on it's way to being toast.

I would also try subbing in the replaced 1gb drive where the internal 500 mb is now, format with dos and see if it boots as ID 0.  If this works, remove termination and add the external drives as required by documentation, then see if it still boots with the proper drive id's.

Good luck.

Chris Maylor

0

Featured Post

How to run any project with ease

Manage projects of all sizes how you want. Great for personal to-do lists, project milestones, team priorities and launch plans.
- Combine task lists, docs, spreadsheets, and chat in one
- View and edit from mobile/offline
- Cut down on emails

Join & Write a Comment

Suggested Solutions

Let's say you need to move the data of a file system from one partition to another. This generally involves dismounting the file system, backing it up to tapes, and restoring it to a new partition. You may also copy the file system from one place to…
Why Shell Scripting? Shell scripting is a powerful method of accessing UNIX systems and it is very flexible. Shell scripts are required when we want to execute a sequence of commands in Unix flavored operating systems. “Shell” is the command line i…
Learn how to find files with the shell using the find and locate commands. Use locate to find a needle in a haystack.: With locate, check if the file still exists.: Use find to get the actual location of the file.:
This video shows how to set up a shell script to accept a positional parameter when called, pass that to a SQL script, accept the output from the statement back and then manipulate it in the Shell.

763 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question

Need Help in Real-Time?

Connect with top rated Experts

14 Experts available now in Live!

Get 1:1 Help Now