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Invalid Page Fault OLE32.DLL in Word 97

Posted on 1997-12-11
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Last Modified: 2012-06-27
After Word 97 crashed, i tried to recover the document
but i receive an error message:
'this program has performed an illegal
operation and will be shut down'
when i press the 'details' button it says:
'WINWORD caused an invalid page fault in module OLE32.DLL at...'
i have tried to recover th document at all the methods MS offer but have only recovered about 50%.
is there a way to recover the rest of the document?
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Question by:vmerki
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by:Danimal
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Gross problem.  I'd be mad.

Good luck.
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by:Danimal
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Have you tried opening the automatic backup document (the one that begins with a $ followed by your file name) using wordpad or some other text editor.  You might at least be able to get your text back that way.

Also, I am wondering if the crash happened as part of writing out  to the automatic backup document.  If the crash came in the middle of the backup being made, I would guess that you are out of luck.  Even Norton Utilities, I'm told, cannot recover a file that is trashed by overwriting it with a bad file that has the same name.
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by:Danimal
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If you don't have a good Virus scanner (such as Norton or McAffee), I'd get one immediately.  McAffee costs only $20 for the basic edition.
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by:vmerki
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dew_associates earned 150 total points
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VMerki:

The Recover Text From Any File converter allows you to extract the text from any file. The file does not have to be a Word file.
 
Using the Recover Text From Any File converter does have its
limitations. Document formatting will be lost, along with anything that is not of a text nature. Graphics, fields, drawing objects, and so on, will not be converted. However, headers, footers, footnotes,  endnotes, and field text, will be retained as simple text.

As you know, Word 97 provides a converter for recovering the text from any file.
 
To use the converter on a Word file:
 
1. On the File menu, click Open, and select the document.
2. In the Files Of Type box, select "Recover Text from Any File," and click Open.

To use the converter on any non-Word file:
1. On the Tools menu, click Options.
2. Select the General tab.
3. Select the "Confirm conversion at open" check box, and click OK.
4. On the File menu, click Open.
5. Select the File you want to recover, and click OK.You will be presented with the Convert File dialog box.
6. In the Convert File dialog box, select the Recover Text From Any File converter, and click OK. Word will convert the damaged document and recover any text from the document.
 
When Word detects that there is a damaged document to be recovered,  Word displays the following message:
 
Word encountered file corruption while opening <filename>.
Part of this document may be recoverable. Attempt recovery now?
 
This message is displayed when an automatically recovered file is present but Word is unable to recover it. When you start Word, Word finds the document and asks if you want Word to try to recover it.
 
If you click No, Word will not attempt to recover the document, and the document will be permanently lost.
 
If you click Yes, Word will attempt to recover the document. If Word is successful in recovering the file, save the document as a normal Word document.
 
If "Recover Text from Any File" Doesn't Appear in the Convert File dialog box
 
The Recover Text From Any File converter is not installed. You will  need to re-run Setup to install this converter.
 
1. Run Word Setup (it should automatically start in maintenance mode). Click the Add/Remove button.
2. Select the Converters And Filters entry (do not clear the check box) and click Change Option.
3. Select the Text Converters entry (again do not clear the check box) and click Change Option.
4. Select the Recover Text Converter check box, and click OK.
5. Click OK to exit the Converters And Filters dialog box.
6. Click Continue to proceed with the installation of the Recover Text converter.
 
The Setup program will prompt you for the required disks as needed.
 
===============================
Things to Try If the Document Will Open But Exhibits Unexpected behavior
===============================
 
Method 1: Convert the File to Another Format, Then Convert It Back to Word:
 
This is the easiest and most complete document recovery method; always try
it first. Save the file in RTF file format; this format preserves the
formatting in your Microsoft Word for Windows document. After you save the
file in RTF format, re-open the document in Word for Windows, and convert
it from RTF. If this method succeeds, the file corruption is removed during
conversion. If the corruption persists after you save the file in RTF file
format, try saving the file in the following file formats:
 
   Other word processing formats
   Text Only
 
NOTE: Saving files in Text Only format frequently corrects the document
corruption problem; however, all document formatting is lost. This method
requires more reformatting; therefore, use it only after other file formats
fail to correct the problem.
 
Method 2: Copy Everything Except the Last Paragraph Mark to a New Document:
 
Word for Windows associates a wide variety of formatting with the last
paragraph mark, especially section and style formatting. If you copy
everything except the last paragraph mark to a new document, the corruption
may be left behind in the original document. In the new document, reapply
the section or style formatting.
 
NOTE: You can select everything except the last paragraph mark by pressing
CTRL+END, and then CTRL+SHIFT+HOME.
 
Method 3: Copy the Undamaged Portions of the Document to a New Document:
 
Sometimes you can determine the location of file corruption in your
document. In such cases, copy everything except the damaged portion to a
new file, and then use the following steps to reconstruct your document:
 
1. After you copy the undamaged portions of your document to a new file,
   save a copy of the damaged document in Text Only format.
 
2. Open the Text Only file. Copy the text from this file and paste it into
   the file that contains the undamaged portion of your document.
 
3. Reformat the sections you pasted in step 2, and then save the recovered
   document.
 
Things to Try If the Document Will Not Open
-------------------------------------------
 
There are several techniques you can use to try to open a document that
will not open. Which method you use depends on the nature and severity of
the damage to your document and the nature of the behavior exhibited.
Although many of these methods succeed regularly, not every damaged
document can be recovered.
 
Method 1: Open the Damaged Word Document in Draft Mode:
 
Sometimes you can open a document successfully in draft mode when it will
not open in other views. Once you open the file, you may be able to recover
or repair the file.
 
To switch to draft mode in Word, use either of the following procedures:
 
 - On the View menu, click Normal. On the Tools menu, click Options, select
   the View tab, and select the Draft Font option.
 
   -or-
 
 - For Word 6.0 and 7.0, run the following macro to turn off screen
   updating, open your damaged document, switch to draft mode, and then
   reactivate screen updating:
 
      Sub Main
         ScreenUpdating 0
         FileOpen .Name = "<path>\Filename.doc"   ' include the path and
                                                  ' substitute your file
                                                  ' name
         ToolsOptionsView .DraftFont = 1
         ScreenUpdating
      End Sub
 
   NOTE: In this macro, substitute the name of your damaged document
   for the "Filename.doc" argument text.
 
   Using this macro may enable you to open documents that you cannot
   otherwise open due to damage that affects printer setup, page layout, or
   screen updates in Word. For example, if a general protection (GP) fault
   occurs in Word before the document is opened, you may be able to avoid
   the GP fault by opening the document using the above macro.
 
   WARNING: ANY USE BY YOU OF THE CODE PROVIDED IN THIS ARTICLE IS AT YOUR
   OWN RISK. Microsoft provides this macro code "as is" without warranty of
   any kind, either express or implied, including but not limited to the
   implied warranties of merchantability and/or fitness for a particular
   purpose.
 
Method 2: Insert the Document as a File in a New Document:
 
The final paragraph mark in a Word document contains information about the
document. If the document is damaged, you may be able to retrieve the text
of the document if you can omit this final paragraph mark.
 
To access a document but leave its final paragraph mark behind, use the
following steps:
 
1. Create a new blank document.
 
2. On the Insert menu, click File.
 
3. In the Insert File dialog box, locate and select the damaged document,
   and click OK.
 
You may need to reapply some section formatting to the last section of the
document.
 
Method 3: Open the File by Linking to It
 
This method works for Word 2.0, 7.0, and 97 (not 6.0) For more information
see the note at the bottom of this method.
 
If the "Insert the Document as a File in a New Document" (Method 2) doesn't
work, try this method. This method allows you to access the document
without bringing over the final paragraph mark. In addition, when you
create a link, part of the header information is not read.
 
This method allows you to open the file if this part of the header or if
the final paragraph mark is in the damaged area of the document.
 
Use the following steps to link to a "good: file (a file that has not been
corrupted) and then change the link to point to the damaged file:
 
1. Create a new document. In the new document, type "This is a Test."
   Save the document.
 
2. Select the text and click Copy on the Edit menu.
 
3. Click New on the File menu. In the new document, click Paste Special on
   the Edit menu.
 
4. Select either Unformatted or Formatted text, and click Paste Link.
   Press OK.
 
5. On the Edit menu, click Links.
 
   The Links dialog box is displayed.
 
6. Select the file name of the first linked document and click Change
   Source (in Word 2.x, click Change Link).
 
   The Open dialog box appears and asks which document you want to change
   the link to.
 
7. Select the document you can no longer open and click Open.
 
8. Click OK in the Links dialog box (in Word 2.x, enter the path and
   file name).
 
      The data/text from the damaged Document will appear (provided there
      was any recoverable data/text).
 
9. On the Edit menu, click Links, and click Break Links (Cancel Links in
   Word 2.x).
 
You can now reformat and save the recovered text.
 
NOTE: If you are using Word 6.x, try the following steps:
 
    1. Create a new document. In the new document, type "This is a test".
       Save the document.
 
    2. Select the text and click Copy on the Edit menu.
 
    3. Press the right arrow on the keyboard to deselect the text.
 
       This will put your insertion point on the next line.
 
    4. On the Edit menu, click Paste Special.
 
    5. Select either Unformatted or Formatted text, and click Paste Link.
       Click OK.
 
    6. To display the field codes, press Alt+F9.
 
      The field code will resemble the following:
 
       {LINK Word.Document.6 "C:\\MYDOCS\\TEST.DOC" "DDE_LINK3" \a \r \*
           MERGEFORMAT}
 
    7. Modify the path to the document in the field code to be the path to
       the corrupted document.
 
    8. Delete the "DDE_LINK#" from the field code (include the quotation
       marks).
 
    9. Position insertion point inside the LINK field.
 
   10. Press F9 to update the field.
 
   11. Press ALT+F9 to view the results of the field.
 
   12. To unlink the field and to convert the field to text, press
       CTRL+SHIFT+F9.
 
Method 4: Open the File in WordPad or Microsoft Write
 
When you cannot open a damaged document in Word for Windows (usually
because of corruption in the file header), you can strip out the file
header and open the file as Text Only. When you strip the header
information, all formatting is lost. This method strips out the file header
information.
 
1. Start Microsoft WordPad or Write. (In Windows 95 click Run on the Start
   menu, type "WordPad" [without the quotation marks], and click OK; in
   Windows 3.x, from Microsoft Windows Program Manager, click Run on the
   File menu, type "write" [without the quotation marks], and click OK).
 
2. In WordPad or Write, open the corrupted document.
 
   A dialog box prompts you to specify how you want to convert the file.
 
   Click the No Conversion button.
 
3. The Word for Windows document is now open as a text file. You may
   see binary (foreign) characters at the beginning and end of the
   document. Delete these characters.
 
   NOTE: In Windows 95, the file may be opened intact without further
   conversion or cleanup necessary. If this is the case, save the file
   with a new name and open the file in Word 6.x or later.
 
4. On the File menu, click Save As. In the File Name box, type a new name
   with a .doc file name extension. Before you click the OK button, note
   the directory where the file is being saved so you can easily find it
   when you restart Word for Windows.
 
5. On the File menu, click Exit.
 
6. Restart Word for Windows and open the file you saved from WordPad or
   Write (the file will have the name you gave it in step 4). (On the
   File menu, click Open. In the File Name box, type the path and file
   name of the newly created file, and click OK.)
 
7. In the Convert File dialog box, Text Only should be selected. Choose
   the OK button to open the text file in Word for Windows.
 
8. On the File menu, click Save As, and save the file in Word format.
 
    NOTE: In Word for Windows version 2.0, select Word Document (*.doc) in
    the Save File As Type box. In Word for Windows version 1.x, choose the
    Options button and select Normal in the File Format box.
 
9. In the File Name box, type a new name for the file, and
   click OK.
 
The file is now in Word for Windows format. You can reopen it and replace
any necessary graphics, fields, and formatting.
 
Method 5: Strip Out the File Header Information:
 
NOTE: This method works with MS-DOS versions 3.0 to 6.2 only.
 
Use this method only if all other methods fail. When you cannot open a
damaged document in Word for Windows (usually because of corruption in
the file header), you can strip out the file header and open the file as
Text Only. When you strip the header information, all formatting is lost.
 
1. At an MS-DOS prompt, type the following, then press ENTER
 
      copy con+FILE NAME.DOC NEWNAME.DOC
 
   where "FILE NAME" is the name of the Damaged file, and "NEWNAME" is
   the name of the new file. (This causes the word "CON" to appear and
   the insertion point to blink on a blank line.)
 
2. Press the SPACEBAR twelve times.
 
3. Press F6, and then press ENTER.
 
4. Start Word for Windows and open the new file.
 
5. Delete the odd characters at the beginning and end of the file.  The
   text of the file is usually intact in the middle of the file.
 
6. Reformat the document and save it in Word for Windows format.
 
   NOTE: If the file was saved in Word for Windows with the Allow Fast
   Saves check box selected, the text may appear in noncontiguous blocks.
   The Fast Save feature keeps track of the changes that you make by
   appending the changes to the end of your document and remembering where
   these changes go. At regular intervals, Fast Save updates the document
   with these changes (this method is faster and takes less memory than
   saving the entire document). If your document becomes damaged before
   Fast Save has a chance to build a complete, updated copy of your
   document, you may need to re-order the text (move the appended text to
   its appropriate place in the document) and then reformat it.


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