How to copy an only executalbe file

Hi there,

I'd like to copy a file which is protected for writing as well as for reading. The only thing I can do is to execute it. Is it possible to copy a file like this to anywhere else? And if YES: How can I do it?

Thanks for your help
scotty

gageliAsked:
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rickyrCommented:
Hiya...

As a normal user you can't copy something if you aint got read permission, Unless of course you are root. If a file you want to copy is owned by you then read on.

add read permission to the file...
$ chmod u+r filetocopy
copy the file...
$ cp filetocopy copiedfile
take away read permission from the copied file...
$ chmod u-r copiedfile
take read permission away from the filetocopy...
$ chmod u-r filetocopy

or to automate this you could write a script...

launch vi...

$ vi

type the following....

#!/bin/sh
if [ $# -ne 2 ] ; then
echo usage mycp [ fromfile tofile ]
exit
fi
chmod u+r $1
cp $1 $2
chmod u-r $2
chmod u-r $1

type...

:w mycp

type...

Hold shift and type ZZ

then make your file executable...

$chmod u+x mycp

now type....

$ mycp filetocopy newfilename

What I have suggested is just a work around, This is why I have only supplied a comment and not an answer. the real answer to your question is "it cant be done unles your root"
I hope I helped
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n0thingCommented:
I agree with rickyr. You cannot copy an excutable only file.
You'll have be root or hacked root.

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rbrCommented:
For copying the file you have to get read access. If the file isn't yours only the owner of the file or root can change the access. chmod a+r filename
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rickyrCommented:
Hi
You do not need to get the owner of the file to do this for you.
You can do this yourself if you know the password of the owner of
the file. then....

$> su file_owner
$> password: file_owner_passwd

This is of course a security risk (knowledge of others passwords), but the su utility is for switching users, whether you are super-user or a normal user.

$> su - file_owner

to get the new users environment, no hyphen to retain your environment.

The script I have mentioned above could be owned by the file_to_copy owner and given SUID access...
$> chmod u+s mycp
Then whoever runs it, it will be run as the owner of the file
file_to_copy. Beware of the security risks aswell. chmod a+r
will give read access to the world.

Okay gageli....
Whos been the most help here?
Maybe I should have supplied the above as an answer, but I believe "It cant be done, but heres a sloppy work around" is just not good enough for an answer, Go and get your points back.
regards
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