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Shared Object Search Path

Posted on 1997-12-17
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Last Modified: 2007-02-13
I have a simple question about how linux searches shared objects. I made some lib*.so files and want to put them all in one directory other than /lib or /usr/lib. I know that, in Solaris, we only need to add the path to the directory to LD_LIBRARY_PATH. But seems like this isn't the way it works in linux. How to do this in Linux?
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Question by:swlee
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ahoffmann earned 50 total points
ID: 1634855
Have you tried  LD_AOUT_LIBRARY_PATH ?

Also keep in mind that your executable may restrict searching shared objects, check with: ldd your_program
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