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Solaris 2.x Hard disk add.

Posted on 1997-12-19
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Last Modified: 2013-12-16
Have Sparcstation running Sol 2.5.1.  This system had 3 hard
drives.  Target 0 had the O/S.  Target 2 and 3 were general
program/data storage devices.  Of course, I had no backups. (i've since decided not to push my luck and bought a tapedrive).  Target 0, main drive, bit the dust.  Reloaded the O/S and rebuilt passwd/shadow /etc /opt /var (etc.etc.)
Now the question.  How do I get the other two drives back online, mounted.  Is this the vfstab or mnttab entries?  Do I have to run newfs on these (and how).  Basically just want the drives back up and the programs/data available.  This is a standalone system, but is used to dial up and get ppp connection.  The directory structure, I'm thinking may be duplicated on the new device.  I believe there was /opt or some such on the externals, and /opt was built on the new internal.  Thanks for your help.
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Question by:dkingsf
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gormenghast earned 100 total points
ID: 1812812
Hi
It is the vfstab file you need to add entries to. This contains information about all disk partitions to mount at boot.
To find out which partitions you wish to mount from your external drives you may have to use format -- just to see what partitions you have.
# format
specify disk.....
format> partition
partition> print
This will show which partitions you have. Then quit from format (^D will quit straight out of format).
If you are unsure about the format command check out the man pages first.
Then you need to add entries in vfstab in the same fashion as the entries you will already see in there for your boot disk.
If your disks were partitioned as a single large partition you will only need to mount /dev/dsk/c0t2d0s2 and /dev/dsk/c0t3d0s2.

To check all this out before editing vfstab, just use the mount command to mount partitions of your externals temporarily.
# mount /dev/dsk/c0t2d0s2 /mnt

Your external disks should not need to have fsck run on them as losing the original boot disk should not have affected these.
Anyway when you try to mount them if there is anything wrong with them you will be informed.

As for /opt -- if you have room in your new directory on the boot disk then mount your external /opt somewhere (/mnt) and copy the contents to the new /opt. Or have the old /opt mounted somewhere permanently and create links to the necessary directories in /opt  on the boot disk.

Hope this helps..
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Expert Comment

by:rickyr
ID: 1812813
Hi...
Just beat me to it gormenghast, I was typing when you added your answer, anyway.
Sounds good to me? just to add.
Did we checked the target nos. If the new internal is set to the default target for a startup drive in Solaris, it will be set to target 3, and will of course clash with the existing external device.
Have the target nos been changed by installing the new internal?

Did we do...
>probe-scsi
at the prom level, just to make sure.

Merry christmas all.

regards
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Author Comment

by:dkingsf
ID: 1812814
Thanks...I figured it was some such.  Just pretty new to unix filesystems and they never spell it out in the books I have...
Wonderfull job, both of you!
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