Checking type of File Data

I am trying to find a way to check if the data in a file is binary or text.  I tried to use CFile Open with CFile::typeText as a flag, but I get an exception and informed that this flag is not supported.  Can someone please tell me how I can go into a file pick a portion of the data and verify that the data is text data or binary data.  I need to be able to verify the portion picked is not text data. When I go into MSVC and open the file it tells me weather or not this data is text, so there must be a way.  Please supply the code needed to do this.
Thanks
sjmAsked:
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SrwCommented:
All files are just byte streams.  There really is no Text vs. Binary.  Those file opening modes just refer to how whitespace and CR/LF pairs are handled.

A file's type (text / binary) is a more or less an arbitrary distinction.  Your requirements determine if the file is "binary"  So, why must you have a "binary" file?  What is it about a "text" file that is bad for you?
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chensuCommented:
Take a look at Previously Asked Windows Programming Question: "Determine if a file is ascii or binary" (http://www.experts-exchange.com/topics/bin/Q.8630024172). I am sorry that it will take you 5 more Points. Because there are some comments, you'd better see the original question.

BTW, CFile::typeText is used in derived classes only (for example, CStdioFile).
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WBerthinCommented:
Hi sjm:  My thoughts on this topic are as follows:

Each Byte of text data always has values less than 128.
Text only uses the low seven bits of an eight bit byte;
while binary data uses all eight bits and binary bytes
can have values as high as 255. Thus you can determine
a file contains binary and not text if it has byte values
in excess of 127 in it. You cannot determine a file is
text and not binary (because text is basically a subset of binary) and just because a file contains no byte values
greater than 127 does not mean it is not a binary file,
although it could certainly be considered a text file.

The code to check would be as follows:

CString strFileName = "c:\TestFile";

//CREATE A CFile OBJECT TO OPEN THE FILE
CFile* pFile;
TRY
{
      pFile = new CFile(
            strFileName,
            CFile::modeRead | CFile::shareDenyWrite );
}
CATCH( CFileException, e )
{
      if( e->m_cause != CFileException::none )
      MessageBox( "Cannot open this file." , "FILE ACCESS ERROR" , MB_OK );
      return;
}
END_CATCH

//ALLOCATE MEMORY TO READ THE FILE
DWORD dwReadSize = pFile->GetLength();
HANDLE hFile = GlobalAlloc(GMEM_FIXED, dwReadSize0);
if( !hFile )
{
      MessageBox("Unable to allocate RAM to read the file.", "MEMORY ALLOCATION ERROR", MB_OK);
      delete pFile;
      return;
}
BYTE* pbyFile = (BYTE*)hFile;

//READ THE FILE
UINT nBytesRead = pFile->Read(pbyFiler, dwReadSize);
if( nBytesRead != dwReadSize )
{
      MessageBox("Cannot read this file.", "FILE READ ERROR", MB_OK);
      delete pFile;
      GlobalFree(hFIle);
      return;
}

//TEST FOR A BINARY FILE
BOOL bFileIsText = TRUE;
for(DWORD; i<dwReadSize; i++)
{
      if(pbyFile[i] > 127)
      {
            bFileIsText = FALSE;
            break;
      }
}

//AT THIS POINT bFileIsText WILL TELL TYPE OF FILE

//CLEAN UP
delete pFile;
GlobalFree(hFie);

Hope that helps out.

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chensuCommented:
The text files WBerthin is referring to are pure ASCII English text files. It does not apply to the text files in other languages.
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sjmAuthor Commented:
Thanks for all the input but the points go to WBerthin.  He gave me the code to find the answer.  WBerthin please send another comment in so I can give you the points.

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WBerthinCommented:
I am pleased if my code helped ...
BUT I think the points belong to chensu!
I just sent a comment on his locked question,
to help out if I could.
Maybe sometime chensu will help out one of my answers.
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chensuCommented:
sjm:
If you would like to give the points to WBerthin, you should reopen the question and ask WBerthin to answer it. Otherwise, it is still locked.
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