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Changing NT password from Win95 PC

I have two users that attach to our NT LAN via fiber. When notified that their password had expired, neither could change it from their Win95 workstations. In order to change their password, they would go to the main building and login at someone else's pc. I gather this is a timeout issue and their registry needs to be edited?? Anyone know what key or am I way off the mark?
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cdub
Asked:
cdub
1 Solution
 
bbaoIT ConsultantCommented:
You may do it as the followings:

1. Right click Network Neighborhood,
2. Choose Properties,
3. Make sure you have installed Clients for Microsoft Networks in the Network Components,
4. Double click Microsoft Network Client option,
5. Select Logon to Windows NT domain,
6. Input Windows NT Domain name,
7. Select Client for Microsoft Networks as your Primary Network Logon,
8. Click OK on Network dialogue box,
9. Restart your system,
10. Logon Windows 95,
11. Open system Control,
12. Double click Password,
13. Click Change Other Password,
14. Double click Microsoft Networks,
15. Change password as your need.

You may also install Win95 version of User Manager for Domains on you Win95 client, then run it to manage user accounts of domains, including changing user password.

This program may be found at NT CD-ROM's Clients\Srvtools\Win95 directory

Hope this helps.
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bbaoIT ConsultantCommented:
:-O Could you tell me why?
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cdubAuthor Commented:
bbao,

When I know, I'll be glad to pass it along. As of right now, I'm still hoping someone else has seen this behavior.

cdub
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cerCommented:
I think Step 13 and 14 of bbao's comment sounds like the way it usually should be done. Does it not work for you ?
Can you explain what you tried/did to change the PW on W95 side?

I doubt the W95 usermanager for domains is a option since these users have to be admins on the NT side to do this.

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cdubAuthor Commented:
I've stumbled upon the solution for this one although I cannot say that I thoroughly understand the whole thing as of yet.

The solution was to edit the Win95 client's registry and change the NODETYPE to equal "8". Apparently some clients had this and some did not even though they all were loaded off the same image.

We're running DHCP on our servers, using NodeType =8.
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bbaoIT ConsultantCommented:
That means you have got the answer?
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bbaoIT ConsultantCommented:
NodeType has effect to password changing? :-(
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cdubAuthor Commented:
bbao,

To answer your question, yes and yes apparently. I have the answer, although not a detailed explanation of the hows and whys of it (I'm pretty much a novice myself) and NodeType when using DHCP apparently has an effect on changing ones password. We setup test PCs here in the office and by changing the NodeType in the Win95 registry, we were able to duplicate both the problem and solution. I also noticed that installing Win95 to the same PC, using the same version of Win95 will produce different results each time in regard to the NodeType.

Thanks for your help...if you have any insight into why this is so, I'd love to hear.

cdub
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cdubAuthor Commented:
cer,

Yes, I'm aware that bbao's steps are the usual way of changing a password under Win95, even though I'm still pretty much a novice that was a no-brainer...but, that is exactly why we were all stumped on this one. We thought it might be a time-out due to the distance until we received calls from other users experiencing the same problem. All of our installs are recent so passwords are just beginning to expire. We called an associate in NY who had the same problem and he explained what to do. I've reported this in the above history.

cdub
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cdubAuthor Commented:
Question answered. Unsure of how to remove.
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bbaoIT ConsultantCommented:
I dont think so. I have a NT based network with DHCP service for 3 subnets, but I have no any problem like yours. The DHCP for the 3 subnets are:

003 Router - ip_address
046 WINS/NBNS Server - ip_address
044 WINS/NBT Node Type = 02

Any idea?
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sniderdCommented:
Here are node types and the name resolution methods utilized by each.

TCP/IP Node-Type Settings in Windows 95
Last reviewed: September 9, 1996
Article ID: Q142042  
The information in this article applies to:
Microsoft Windows 95
The four TCP/IP node types are defined by number in Windows 95:


   1 - bnode (broadcast only)
   2 - pnode (WINS only)
   4 - mnode (broadcast, then WINS)
   8 - hnode (WINS, then broadcast)

The default Windows 95 TCP/IP node types are:

   If DHCP=False, and WINS is disabled, then NodeType=1 (bnode)
   If DHCP=False, and WINS is manually set, then NodeType=8 (hnode)
   If DHCP=True, and DHCP sets WINS, then NodeType=4 (mnode)
   If DHCP=True, and WINS is manually set, then NodeType=8 (hnode)
   If DHCP=True, and WINS is disabled, then NodeType=1 (bnode)

The node type can be manually changed by editing the Windows 95 registry. The location is under the HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE subtree under the following subkey:

   \SYSTEM\CURRENTCONTROLSET\SERVICES\VXD\MSTCP\NodeType

and the four values listed above (1,2,4,8) are valid values for NodeType.  

The question is, what was the node type prior to the change? Node type 8 is typically best when utilizing WINS. Why? If your WINS server is down you can still resolve by broadcast. This controls your broadcasts while still giving some backup resolution method. The best option of course is to have a backup WINS server. In a routed environment, broadcasts will do you no good since they are typically not forwarded through routers. Oh yeah, with NT 5.0, forget all of this.
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cdubAuthor Commented:
You are correct and thanks for the elaboration, although I did find the answer as referenced earlier in the dialogue.
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bbaoIT ConsultantCommented:
:-( Still dont understand how it has effect on changing NT's user password.
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jinweiCommented:
Me too. :--((
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cdubAuthor Commented:
I don't understand it either and have yet to have it explained sufficiently...but, it worked! We've had several users call with this problem and were at a loss as how to fix it. Now we change Node Type to "8", reboot the workstation and they're able to change their password at will.
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