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Repainting system tray

Greetings.  How do you make Win95 repaint the system tray?  I have some custom apps that do not properly remove their system tray icons when exiting, although if you subsequently wave the cursor over them in the system tray, they are deleted.  This makes the user think that the app is still running, when it is not.  I do not have the liberty to rewrite those apps, but I can put a periodic tray repaint in a new app that I am writing.  Doing an Invalidate(NULL, NULL, TRUE) to repaint the entire desktop doesn't do the trick.  Any suggestions? Thanks in advance.
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danbind
Asked:
danbind
1 Solution
 
galkinCommented:
First of all Do you call Shell_NotifyIcon(NIM_DELETE, ...) to remove icon. If you do and it doesn't help you can erase background in system tray only. It has unique class name TrayNotifyWnd and you can use FindWindow with this clss name to obtaing a window handle.
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danbindAuthor Commented:
Thanks for the info.  This seems like it would work, but I believe the problem is this:  even on a repaint, the system tray thinks that the bogus icon should remain, as it was never properly deleted with the Shell_NotifyIcon(NIM_DELETE,...) message.  Upon return from a screen saver, the icon is redrawn.  When you move the cursor over the bogus icon, and the system tray does a callback to get the tooltip caption, it doesn't get one, so it deletes the icon.  You can test this by modifying a program that uses a system tray icon so that it doesn't delete its icon on exiting.  Run it, terminate it from the task list using CTRL+ALT+DEL, and observe.  It seems like one approach would be to ask the system tray to ping all of its icons for valid callback responses (but I can't find any documentation on this).  I'm basically perplexed--it seems like there should be a way to do this.
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fasterCommented:
we have the same problem.
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alexoCommented:
Assuming you only have one tray (you *can* have more...)

HWND hw = FindWindow("Shell_TrayWnd", NULL);


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danbindAuthor Commented:
Yes, this is true, and thanks for the help.  This is the answer to the question that I asked, but I guess I asked it wrong (see previous comments).  Restating, it is this:  How do you delete orphaned icons from the system tray, or force the system tray to validate them?  I would like to be able to split the points between galkin and alexo, as the answers are correct.  I would still like a solution to my problem (if one exists), however.
FYI, I found a posting in DejaNews by Jonathan Edwards showing how to find the number of icons in the tray, although I haven't tried it out.
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_ZaphodCommented:
Windows deletes an orphaned icon if you put the cursor above it and wait for the Tip to come.
My guess is that if you emulate a click on the orphaned icon, Windows will understand its parent has died and will remove it. Use WM_CLICK, WM_LBUTTONDOWN or WM_LBUTTONUP, I guess, on the tray window (finding it as alexo told you), with the parameters pointing to the icon. Shouldn't be too hard.
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danbindAuthor Commented:
I was hoping that there might be another way, as I'm never comfortable imitating user input--but this works well enough, so I guess you get the cigar.  Thanks!
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