StarOffice 3.1 needs newer libc

Hi,

I am running Linux on my DOS machine, Kernel 2.0.0 and a Slackware distribution.
I tried to install StarOffice 3.1, but got an script error when trying to run it. I think this is caused by the wrong libc version.
The StarOffice readme says that I need libc "versino 5.4.4 or later. Is further says that I can tell the version of my libc files by listing the files in my /lib directory.
I did so, and I have a version 5.3.something.
I wrote customer support, and they said I need the later version and gave me an URL where to download it. Unfortunately, it turned out that the files there were for a 680x0 processor, and I needed "i386" files.
I looked for such files, and found a file libc-5.4.38.bin.tar.gz on ftp.linux.org.uk/pub/linux/libc

My questions:
      1) are these files the correct ones?
      1a) If no, where can I find suitable files
      2) how do I install these files? Just unpacking (how?)??

TIA. If it turnes out that the answer has to be quite lengthy, I'll raise the amount of points.
LVL 5
Christian_WenzAsked:
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ResonanceCommented:
Gah.  Okay, let me start by warning you that what you are about to attempt is exceedingly dangerous.  Practically everything on your system depends on libc in some form or another, and changing it can have rather unpredictable effects on some software.  If you mess up somewhere along the way, your entire system will shut down.  

1) Start by creating a backup directory ON YOUR ROOT PARTITION and putting a copy of AT LEAST your /lib/libc.* and /lib/libm.* files there.  Some might recommend backing up the entire /lib directory.  In /usr/lib, make a note of any libc or libm symlinks, and write down where they point.  Make sure you have a rescue disk (complete boot/root pair) and test booting with it to make sure you can.

2) The file you have is the correct one.  The .bin.tar.gz files are designed to be unpacked from / and automatically replace any older files on your system.  I recommend however that you first decompress the file into a temporary directory and make a note of what files it intends to change.  Back up any of those that you think look critical or don't recognize.

3) Once you've taken care of my paranoia-induced recommendations:

cd /
tar xzvf /yourdirectory/libc.5.4.38.bin.tar.gz
cd /usr/lib

Check that the symlinks for libc.so and libm.so are pointing to the new file.  If not, change them to do so.

Reboot.


So as you can see, the answer is downright simplistic in terms of what you have to do to upgrade, but I've added a seriously paranoid tone to the entire thing to make sure you don't go into it completely unaware, since I once mangled my system doing a similar upgrade (for any inclined to scoff, it was a libc -> glibc process, which is somewhat nastier, but what killed my system was a simple idiotic thing that could show up anywhere, and it turned out that my rescue disk had died somewhere along the way without me noticing).  

FWIW, people do this kind of thing all the time without screwing up, and the odds are much in your favor that you won't encounter any kind of problem whatsoever.  Just make sure that rescue disk works for the one in a thousand chance that you do :)

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Christian_WenzAuthor Commented:
thanks for your answer. Since there were no critical data on the linux partition (and as I installed the distribution just a week ago), I omitted your warnings and installed the file :-)
I now have an additional questions for 50 points, which I would like to give you the chance to answer again:
/usr/lib/libm.so seems to be a links to /lib/libm.so.5.0.6
/lib/libm.so.5 seems to be a link to /lib/libm.so.5.0.6

when I now try to launch XF86 using "startx", it says:
'lib/libm.so.5' is not a ELF executable for 386/486

Do I have the wrong files?!?!
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Christian_WenzAuthor Commented:
found out by myself now - got the 68K files... Thanks for you help - the libc's work fine! :-)
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