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Serial protocol for an IBM 3117 Scanner

Posted on 1998-01-13
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Last Modified: 2013-11-21
I've got an IBM 3117 scanner with the GPIB(IEEE488) to serial converter module.
What speed/bits etc is it running and what should I be
sending it?
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Question by:Fredd
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by:JBURGHARDT
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If you use serial port for pp scanner then you will have some problems with drivers serial port is the slowest
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by:JBURGHARDT
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DO NOT use the serial convert module scaning with it will be veru slow just go with pp you can buy add on card for $19 (16bit)  also you can buy PCI for more

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by:Fredd
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The scanner does not have a pp or scsi interface, it only has
GPIB (General Purpose Interface bus) or IEEE-488, so I'm afraid the serial module is the only communication method due to the high cost of GPIB cards.

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by:nebworth
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  I'm not familiar with IEEE488...  That's the small centronics port, right?  I assume that this port is a parallel communications port (IE: 8 bits at a time)... That means the rate would be set at the adapter.  Being at a loss, I would GUESS 9600, 8 bits, no parity and one stop bit.  BUT, if you look really closely at trends, you may be able to find out what serial protocols were really, really popular at IBM at the time the scanner was popular.  With IBM, it's hard to figure on a rational answer...
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jrhelgeson earned 200 total points
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IEEE 488 to Serial converter should support TX/RX Speeds to 56k and beyond.  It depends on the UART used in the transciver.
Does the unit have dip switches?

It has been a long time since I have worked with the GPIB, but this is what I could remember for the interface.

Serial Interface

Duplex: Full with echo/no-echo
Data Bits: 7 or 8
Stop Bits: 1 or 2
Parity: On transmit; odd, even, mark, space, or disabled
Baud Rates: 110, 300, 600, 1200, 1800, 2400, 3600, 4800, 7200, 9600, 19200, and 57600
Terminator: CR, LF, CRLF or LFCR
Control: Supports Clear To Send (CTS), Request To Send (RTS), or XON/XOFF

IEEE 488 Interface

Terminator: CR, LF, CRLF, LFCR and/or EOI
Connector: Standard IEEE 488

All paramaters should be selectable through dip switches, If there are no dip switches available, It should be 19200,8,n,1.
If you have the model with the dip switches, I'll need the part number.

Joel R. Helgseon
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