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Installing Win95 after NT

Posted on 1998-01-14
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Last Modified: 2013-12-16
I've got NT with NTFS on my PC. I've got one HD, with a NTFS partition and an unused partition. I want to install Win95 on the unused partition.
Can I boot from a Windows 95 floppy, run fdisk, create a new partition, set it to the active partition, reboot, install Win95? When I want to run NT again can I then use fdisk to set active partition to NTFS again?
Are there any perils I should look out for here?
Are there any other ways of doing this?

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Question by:roar
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biyiadeniran earned 100 total points
ID: 1753332
rather than using Fdisk all the time NT loader has a facility that allows you multiboot. The only thing is that the boot partition needs to be FAT. So first create an emergency repair disk for your NT and the first 3 disk for installing NT by running "winnt32 /o".
Use Fdisk to create a new partition and set it active.

Install windows95.
start it to make sure it works fine.
After completely installing Windows95 onto the system and rebooting as necessary, restart your system using your Windows NT Setup disks.
   During Setup, select R to repair Windows NT.
 
NOTE: You only need to repair the Windows NT boot sector. You should not choose to inspect the registry files, the Windows NT system files, or the Windows NT boot environment during this procedure. So select [] inspect boot sector i.e it should be the only one with a mrak all the other 3 should be blank so you have
[] Inspect registry files
[] Inspect Startup enir...
[] Verify ...
[x] Inspect boot sector
 
Once you have repaired the Windows NT boot sector will need to
manually edit the Boot.ini file to include an option to boot to win95.
   The Boot.ini file is a read-only, hidden, system file located in the root directory of the boot drive. The following line should be added to the Boot.ini file under the operating systems section:
 
      c:\bootsect.dos="Windows 95".

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by:roar
ID: 1753333
I'm aware that I could multiboot if the boot partition was FAT, but it's not. It's NTFS.
Using fdisk all the time is certainly not ideal, but do I have any other options given that my current NT partition is NTFS?
Should the fdisk procedure I described work, or will I run into trouble?
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Author Comment

by:roar
ID: 1753334
I'm aware that I could multiboot if the boot partition was FAT, but it's not. It's NTFS.
Using fdisk all the time is certainly not ideal, but do I have any other options given that my current NT partition is NTFS?
I will not need to change very often, I mainly use NT, but occasionally I need Win95.
Should the fdisk procedure I described work, or will I run into trouble with it?
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Expert Comment

by:biyiadeniran
ID: 1753335
You should still be able to run your NT even though it is on NTFS partition.
The boot loader will be in the FAT partition but will point to NTFS partition for the boot files.
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Author Comment

by:roar
ID: 1753336
Thanks. Great answer!

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