CD Audio vs Data

My company has just produced a CD Rom which is both audio (able to be played on a stereo cd player) and data (contains video, and other multimedia stuff).  It is meant to work on Win3.11, Win95, and Mac - and it does on most computers.
However, some of our customers only get the option to play the audio when accessing the disk in Win3.11.  They cannot access the files on the cd.  I'm not sure if it is a hardware, software, o/s, drivers, or wind direction problem.
Any ideas on a solution?
Thanks.
ParaTroopAsked:
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rmarottaCommented:
ParaTroop,
Is the CD that you are producing created on a CD-recorder?
If so, the media used is not as reflective of the laser light, making it unreadable in some CDROM readers.  Most of the new multi-speed drives can handle it, but the 2x and slower ones have difficulty.
Hope this helps,
Ralph

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magigrafCommented:
ParaTroop...

What format has been using when burning the CD??
Joliet or ISO etc...
What program did you guys used??

Regards
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PBMaxCommented:
The problem isn't with the CD being nonreflective.  It reads the CD audio.  This is a enhanced CD which has audio and data on the Cd.  The way this is done is that there are acutally TWO sessions on the CD.  The first session is CD audio.  this is because CD players can only read one session, it being the first.  This is the reason why they don't get wierd noises when playing the cd in an audio Cd player.  The second session is data which is able accessable only in multi session CDroms.  My guess is that the CDRom drive that your client has is not multisession capable. (Inferred this from the use of Win3.11 which is virutally nonexistant on newer machines) The CDrom is just not able to read past the first session and cannot access the data.  
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busukaCommented:
ParaTroop, I suggest reject original answer and accept PBMax one.
He (she) told exactly what I thought: CD in "extended" format,
leading audio tracks, followed by data track. To make CD, readable
by most CD-ROM need to make it "mixed" CD: Mode 1, disk-at-once
mode, hence only one session. First track is data, followed by
RedBook tracks.
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jhanceCommented:
The answer is that it could be EITHER of the above suggestions if you're using CD-R or CD-RW media.  (If it's a silver CDROM, then it's the inability to support multi-session.)
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busukaCommented:
So, we'll wait, till ParaTroop will kindly descend from heavens
and grant us with feedback. :)))
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PBMaxCommented:
There are indeed other ways to write a CD.  You can just write the CD with both data and audio tracks combined in one session which is called mixed mode.  But in this case the CDRom would indeed read both the audio and data tracks and not be restricted to just audio.

PBMax (a HE) :)
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ParaTroopAuthor Commented:
Sorry Ralph, the CD has been professionally pressed by the same company who does our music cd's. And the cd is recognised in the drive, just not the data - like PBMax said. I'm putting this reply to the blokes that produced the cd, but I feel that PBMax's answer seems to be on the right track.
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rmarottaCommented:
Is the CD silver or gold?

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ParaTroopAuthor Commented:
Silver.
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rmarottaCommented:
Then indeed PBmax has the best answer for the cause of the problem.  I can't think of a solution.  Maybe the wind is blowing from the wrong direction!
Cheers,
Ralph

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PBMaxCommented:
The problem isn't with the CD being nonreflective. It reads the CD audio. This is a enhanced CD which has audio and data on the Cd. The way this is done is that there are acutally TWO sessions on the CD. The first session is CD audio. this is because CD players can only read one session, it being the first. This is the reason why they don't get wierd noises when playing the cd in an audio Cd player. The second session is data which is accessable only in multi session CDroms. My guess is that the CDRom drive that your client has is not multisession capable. (Inferred this from the use of Win3.11 which is virutally nonexistant on newer machines) The CDrom is just not able to read past the first session and cannot access the data.
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ParaTroopAuthor Commented:
Thanks for the answer PBMax.  Putting this to the rest of the team, a few started saying "oh yeah... of course" in highly intelligent voices! :-)

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