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Repeated Registry Error

Posted on 1998-01-28
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Last Modified: 2013-12-16
I keep getting a message "Registry Error" it then restores a backup and restarts.
For about 6 weeks now I've tried everything I can think of
to cure this problem: different builds/versions of windows.  Motherboard bios flashes, different bios setting, booting from scsi or ide,  nothing works.  It's happens at seemingly random intervals.
I have a TX board and I have tried several tx win95 updates.  All same problem.

Any ideas?

Ta,
Tim.
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Question by:tims
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by:tims
ID: 1753965
Edited text of question
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by:smeebud
ID: 1753966
When you say, ""Registry Error" it then restores a backup and restarts."
Where is it restoring it from?
And did you set it up this way?
or is that just whats happening and you've no control over it?

I'm asking this 1st because I've not seen that happen.

Let me ask you this, what makes you think it's restoring itself,
is the a message or what?
I need to clear that in my mind before going on.

Oh, BTW, what do you use to backup your regictry with?

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by:glimmer
ID: 1753967
when win95 popup's the Registry error and leave you with the only choice of repair and then restore press repair then win95 will ask you ok to restart just click again on the registry error that is on the back of the screen now do this until the registry error stop then you can click on restart my computer
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by:nebworth
ID: 1753968
  Smeebud, every time Windows95 successfully completes a boot, it backs up the registry files (SYSTEM.DAT, USER.DAT) as SYSTEM.DA0 and USER.DA0.  When Windwos95 has trouble with SYSTEM.DAT and USER.DAT, it reverts to these saved versions.
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by:nebworth
ID: 1753969
  I don't understand the format of Windows 4.x registries, so I don't know why they become corrupt and won't load during boot.  The problem is where both the DAT and DA0 files have the same corruption, so restoring from backup won't ever fix the problem.  I know these guys here have a lot better understanding of registry problems than I have, so I'll mostly just watch this one.  There's a couple of tricks for cleaning registries, some which I have just learned from the guys here.  One, from Magigraf, is re-running setup for windows:  SETUP /p f
     This replaces corrupted Windows files and cleans the registry.
     Another is this, and this is copied VERBATIM from something Smeebud told ME once:

I just did this to my registry right before logging on, this cleans the ^&*( out of you registry:
                 -----
                 Get Rid Of Registry Garbage

                 After a major clean up, you notice that the size of registry remains the same. It's just like how DOS
                 deletes files on the hard disk. The files are not really deleted, they are just floating.
                 In the registry a removed key becomes an invisible existence to the reg editors. You can export keys
                 that are recognizable by the editors to a temp file, then use the same temp file to reconstruct a new
                 registry. And this is how we remove those invisible footprints.

                 WRPV3.ZIP is the Best Backup/Retsore I've Seen. http://www.webdev.net/orca/ Search WRP
                 Step1: Copy all .dat files To a Temp directory for Safety.
                 Step2: Be sure to have a reg backup already.
                 Step3: Open reg editor and export "all entries" to a reg file(MyReg.reg).
                 Step4: Shutdown And Boot to DOS. Go to Windows directory.
                 Step5: Deltree reg files, e.g. deltree *.dat /y
                 Step6: If DOS doesn't Recognize the Hidden Files, Type ATTRIB -H -S -R -S SYSTEM.DAT
                 and ATTRIB -H -S -R -S USER.DAT. Then repeat Step 5.
                 Step7: At C:\Windows> type "regedit /c MyReg.reg", No Quotes. Done!

                 After the process, please exam your system thoroughly. You can never tell from a seemingly healthy
                 system a near-death registry. Also keep the backup for a while before update it.

---------------
    Anyway, it's some food for thought.
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Accepted Solution

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smeebud earned 200 total points
ID: 1753970
I highly recommend this for you. Read carefully
-----------------
After a major clean up, you notice that the size of registry remains the same. It's just like how DOS
deletes files on the hard disk. The files are not really deleted, they are just floating.
In the registry a removed key becomes an invisible existence to the reg editors. You can export keys
that are recognizable by the editors to a temp file, then use the same temp file to reconstruct a new
registry. And this is how we remove those invisible footprints.
Clean the bedevil out of your registry. But 1st; BACKUP YOUR REGISTRY.
NOTE: This works on most systems. In my personal experience, and others that I know of it works
75% of the time. If your computer locks up during the process, or does not show 100% done from
"Real Mode Dos", yet stops: Simply reboot and Import MyReg.reg.
Example: C:\Windows>Regedit Myreg.reg
Or, C:\WRP>RESTORE.

WRPV3.ZIP is the Best and easiest Backup/Restore I've Seen. Go To:
http://www.webdev.net/orca/system.html Search WRP
Step1: Copy all .dat files To a Temp directory for Safety.
Step2: Be sure to have a reg backup already.
Step3: Open reg editor and export "all entries" to a reg file(MyReg.reg).
Step4: Shutdown And Boot to DOS. Go to Windows directory.
Step5: Delete .dat files, e.g. del *.dat /y
Step6: If DOS doesn't Recognize the Hidden Files, Type ATTRIB -H -S -R -S SYSTEM.DAT and

ATTRIB -H -S -R -S USER.DAT. Then repeat Step 5. Step7: At C:\Windows> type "regedit /c
MyReg.reg", No Quotes. Done!
NOTE. If this locks your computer up, Simply Import from C:\Windows>Regedit Myreg.reg
That will put everything back the way it was. Everybodys 95 is different, that's why the warning.
Works great for me, not so great for others, so, even if you get the 100%, check you system out,
keyboard, applications, modem; everything! FELL SAFE! You have three backups:
1. MrReg.reg
2. WRP Backup
3. You System.dat and User.dat that you saved in step 1.
After the process, please exam your system thoroughly.
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Expert Comment

by:dew_associates
ID: 1753971
I think I'll sit back and watch for a while before commenting!
Dennis
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Author Comment

by:tims
ID: 1753972
Thanks.
I will try the proposed clean (and backup) when I've replaced my motherboard.  I have been told the QDI Titanium I has problems.  This one sure does.  Last night I tried swapping my motherboard with a friends Gigabyte one, everything else was the same.  It bloody worked.  I believe 9 weeks have been waisted with this probelm. I'm now off to buy a new board.
Thanks again,  Tim.
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Expert Comment

by:smeebud
ID: 1753973
Wow, it seems to be "Bad Motherboard Season".

Thanks for the quote nebworth, I'm flattered.
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