Doubt about URL s

Hi there....

     I would like to know about the different extensions of the URL addressess such as, and some of them need www with them but some don't need please send me a well explained answer. I am looking forward your answer.


Who is Participating?
bigelosConnect With a Mentor Commented:
There isn't a total end all the the URL definitions, which is why the search engines were invented, because it's pretty hard to guess a web site name just knowing something about that site.

www stands for World Wide Web, and in the beginning, web sites all had the www.  Now, with the explosion of the web, too many of the "good" names have been taken, so we have moved on to not requiring the www to indicate a web site.

In general, the .com at the end stands for company or commercial, although many ISPs now have the .com at the end, but host many personal pages.

The .org stands for an organization, not necessarily non-profit, but usually not commercial.

The .edu stands for educational.  It is one of the oldest out there.  All the schools have a .edu at the end.

The .gov stands for government.  You get the picture.

Countries other than the USA have an abbreviated part of their name at the end.  Thus, .ca usually stands for Canada, UK, stands for the UK, etc.

You will also see the .net abbreviation, which stands for network.

Of course, these are just general guidelines, and not necessarily always held to.

Hope this helps out a little.  Let me know if you need more info!

don't forget .mil for the US military, and .gov for the US government.

FYI, there was a proposal about a year ago for the introduction of 7 new top level domain extensions (including .per for personal service providers and .biz for businesses in addition to the .com ones), but it never took off
Question has a verified solution.

Are you are experiencing a similar issue? Get a personalized answer when you ask a related question.

Have a better answer? Share it in a comment.

All Courses

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.