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Mem question

Posted on 1998-02-03
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Last Modified: 2013-12-15
How do I tell Linux than I have 96 MB and not only 64.
(I can't remember   how the append row looks like)

And can I get Linux to understan  how much memory I have if I don't use Lilo. (if I use a zdisk)
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Question by:pucko
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j2 earned 20 total points
ID: 1631325
append="mem=96M"

And as for zdisk... I dont think so?
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by:pucko
ID: 1631326
Thanks....
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