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Modem strings

Posted on 1998-02-03
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Last Modified: 2013-12-27
I was at a computer store and i overheard a technician talking about something like a modem string that makes your connection it's best each time.  For example, you connect at 24.4 bbs with a 33.6 modem but after awhile the server moves your speed up to 33.6 when there is room on the server.  My server is a 56k server and this is supposed to tell the server I have a 33.6 modem and that's the speed i should be going at.  If you know what i'm talking about could you tell me the string and how to use it?  Ask me questions if you need more info.
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Question by:curtf
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by:jhance
ID: 1145265
Don't believe everything you hear from a computer store "technician". (Somebody will surely flame me for this but... most of these technicians are hired more for their willingness to work for low pay than for their technical skills.)  

Anyway, by default, modems will connect at the highest speed possible due to the conditions of the phone line and this is not controlled by the server.  All current generation modems are also "adaptive". This means that they will attempt to respond to changing line conditions by raising or lowering their bit rate.  
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by:curtf
ID: 1145266
The guy that i heard say this doesn't work for money.  He's an old man and just like's the people.  
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by:magigraf
ID: 1145267
curtf..
I'll be more than delighted to know that switch too..
While this does not sound reasonable at all, but MAYBE...he has a trick that we can learn.
Regards
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by:jhance
ID: 1145268
Fine, an old guy who works at a computer store free knows things about modems that nobody else does.  Having worked at Rockwell Semiconductor for 6 years designing the things I can tell you that there is no such secret string!
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by:j2
ID: 1145269
THat string is bullshit.. nothing like that exists. How will an Initstring tell the phonelines how good they should be?) The only thing you can tell the modem is "Hey, if you dont get a 33.6K connect, Hang up"

There is NO way to force a connect at a certan speed.
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Author Comment

by:curtf
ID: 1145270
FINE!!  I'll ask the guy and if i get positive results, i'll add a comment telling all you the string.
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by:j2
ID: 1145271
Looking forward to learning the results of this revolutionary discovery.
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by:rbr
ID: 1145272
It would be very interesting for me to get such an information, even I think there could not be such a init string.
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Expert Comment

by:wizzy
ID: 1145273
I think what he ment is that a Modem RETRAINS up to speed whenever possible. What that means is that if you connect 19.2 KBS out of the possible 33.6 possibe, that means you had a bad phone line. When the phone line quality of that call increases, it will RETRAIN UP, which means it gives the dial-in hub the "OK" to make the call a 21.3, 24, 26, 28.8, etc etc etc...... It basically increases the call speed to make the most of your call.
It works the other way too, meaning that if you connect to your ISP at 31.200 and your phone line quality decreases, then your modem will retrain down to make up for the lost of quality and to improve stability. When the line gets better, then the modems will retrain up again

So to answer your question, there is NO init string to "enable" this feature, because its always on by default, BUT there IS an INIT string to disable this feature. Look in your manual for that string.
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by:magigraf
ID: 1145274
Wizzy...

Where is the NEW answer??
We all said that there isn't, and now you said the same thing.
Do you think is even fair to post an answer that has been offered before from the other techs here??
I guess not.
Your answer should have been labeled as a Comment.

Regards

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Author Comment

by:curtf
ID: 1145275
My modem does not retain up to a faster speed after I connect, it stays at one speed for the entire connection.  None of you get the points because there is no answer to this question
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Accepted Solution

by:
dew_associates earned 20 total points
ID: 1145276
Curtf, I'm blocking this question purely for the reason that I believe that you have confused the issues of what that little old man may have suggested with modem speed. There are 2 issues here, actual transmission speeds of the modem and the ability of windows to handle data transmission packets efficiently and transmit them quickly. The "little old man" was probably referring to "MTU"

This information was released on 12/31/97 as noted:
==============
PSS ID Number: Q158474
Article last modified on 12-31-1997
 
95
 
WINDOWS
 

======================================================================
********************************************************************
     BETA INFORMATION  BETA INFORMATION  BETA INFORMATION  BETA
 
     This article discusses a Beta release of a Microsoft
     product. The information in this article is provided as-is
     and is subject to change without notice.
 
     No formal product support is available from Microsoft for
     this Beta product. For information about obtaining support
     for a Beta release, please see the documentation included
     with the Beta product files, or check the Web location
     from which you downloaded the release.
 
     BETA INFORMATION  BETA INFORMATION  BETA INFORMATION  BETA
********************************************************************
 
---------------------------------------------------------------------
The information in this article applies to:
 
 - Microsoft Windows 95
 - Microsoft Windows 98
---------------------------------------------------------------------
 
IMPORTANT: This article contains information about editing the registry.
Before you edit the registry, you should first make a backup copy of the
registry files (System.dat and User.dat). Both are hidden files in the
Windows folder.
 
SUMMARY
=======
 
This article documents the Windows 95 registry entries for the TCP/IP
protocol. For more information about Windows 95 TCP/IP settings, see
the Win95rk.hlp file in the Admin\Reskit\Helpfile folder on the Windows
95 CD-ROM.
 
MORE INFORMATION
================
 
WARNING: Using Registry Editor incorrectly can cause serious problems
that may require you to reinstall Windows 95. Microsoft cannot guarantee
that problems resulting from the incorrect use of Registry Editor can be
solved. Use Registry Editor at your own risk.
 
NOTE: For information about how to edit the registry, view the Changing
Keys And Values online Help topic in Registry Editor (Regedit.exe). Note
that you should make a backup copy of the registry files (System.dat and
User.dat) before you edit the registry.
 
The Value entries described in this article do not normally exist in the
Windows 95 registry; they must be added to the following registry key:
 
   Hkey_Local_Machine\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\VxD\MSTCP
 
Values
------
 
BroadcastAddress = broadcast address in hexadecimal
 
Data Type: DWORD
 
Specifies the address to use for NetBIOS name query broadcasts. The
default is based on the IP address and the subnet mask.
 
BcastNameQueryCount = integer
 
Data Type: DWORD
 
Specifies the number of times the system will retry NetBIOS name query
broadcasts. The default is 3.
 
BcastQueryTimeout = milliseconds
 
Data Type: DWORD
 
Specifies the period of time the system will wait before timing out
broadcast name queries. The minimum value is 100. The default is 750.
 
BSDUrgent = 0 or 1
 
Data Type: DWORD
 
If this value is 1, it specifies that Microsoft TCP/IP is to treat
urgent data the way some UNIX systems do (with a maximum of 1 byte of
urgent data, for example). If this value is 0, it specifies that the
stack is to handle urgent data as specified by RFC 1122. The default is
1.
 
CacheTimeout = milliseconds
 
Data Type: DWORD
 
Specifies how long NetBIOS names are cached. The minimum is 60,000
milliseconds (1 minute). The default is 360,000 milliseconds (6
minutes).
 
DeadGWDetect = 0 or 1
 
Data Type: DWORD
 
Specifies whether Microsoft TCP/IP will use another gateway if the
current default gateway seems to be down. The default is 1.
 
DefaultRcvWindow = 16-bit number
 
Data Type: DWORD
 
Specifies the default receive window advertised by TCP. The default is
8192.
 
DefaultTOS = 8-bit number
 
Data Type: DWORD
 
Specifies the default type of service (TOS) for IP packets initiated by
Microsoft TCP/IP. The default is 0.
 
DefaultTTL = 8-bit number
 
Data Type: String
 
Specifies the default time to live (TTL) for IP packets from Microsoft
TCP/IP. The default is 32.
 
DnsServerPort = port
 
Data Type: DWORD
 
Specifies which DNS server port to send queries to when resolving a name
using DNS. The default is 53.
 
EnableProxy = 0 or 1
 
Data Type: DWORD
 
If this value is 1, it specifies that this computer is a WINS proxy
agent. The default is 0.
 
EnableRouting = 0 or 1
 
Data Type: DWORD
 
Specifies whether to enable static routing. Microsoft TCP/IP does not
supply a routing protocol, so all route table entries must be entered
using the route command. The default is 0.
 
IGMPLevel = 0, 1, or 2
 
Data Type: DWORD
 
Specifies the level of support allowed for IP multicast, corresponding
to the levels in RFC 1112. The default is 2.
 
InitialRefreshT.O. = milliseconds
 
Data Type: DWORD
 
Specifies the interval over which to contact WINS to refresh the name.
The minimum is 16 minutes, and the maximum is approximately 50 days
(0xFFFFFFFF). The default is 960,000 milliseconds (16 minutes).
 
KeepAliveTime = milliseconds
 
Data Type: String
 
Specifies the connection idle time in milliseconds before TCP will begin
sending keepalives, if keepalives are enabled on a connection. The
default is 2 hours (7,200,000).
 
KeepAliveInterval = 32-bit number
 
Data Type: DWORD
 
Specifies the time in milliseconds between retransmissions of
keepalives, once the KeepAliveTime has expired. Once KeepAliveTime has
expired, keepalives are sent every KeepAliveInterval milliseconds until
a response is received, up to a maximum of MaxDataRetries before the
connection is aborted. The default is 1 second (1000).
 
LmhostsTimeout = milliseconds
 
Data Type: DWORD
 
Specifies the period of time the system will wait before timing out when
seeking LMHOSTS for name resolution. The minimum value is 1000 (1
second). The default is 10,000 (10 seconds).
 
MaxConnections = 32-bit number
 
Data Type: DWORD
 
Specifies the maximum number of concurrent connections. The default is
100.
 
MaxConnectRetries = Number
 
Data Type: String
 
Specifies the number of times a connection attempt (SYN) will be
retransmitted before giving up. The initial retransmission timeout is 3
seconds, and it is doubled each time up to a maximum of 2 minutes. The
default is 3.
 
MaxDataRetries = 32-bit number
 
Data Type: String
 
Specifies the maximum number of times a segment carrying data or an FIN
will be retransmitted before the connection is aborted. The
retransmission timeout itself is adaptive and will vary according to
link conditions. The default is 5.
 
NameServerPort = port
 
Data Type: DWORD
 
Specifies the UDP port on the name server to which to send name queries
or registrations. The default is 137.
 
NameSrvQueryCount = integer
 
Data Type: DWORD
 
Specifies the number of times the system will try to contact the WINS
server for NetBIOS name resolution. The default is 3.
 
NameSrvQueryTimeout = milliseconds
 
Data Type: DWORD
 
Specifies how long the system waits before timing out a name server
query. The minimum is 100. The default is 750.
 
NameTableSize = integer
 
Data Type: DWORD
 
Specifies the maximum number of names in the NetBIOS name table. The
minimum allowable value is 1 and the maximum is 255. The default is 17.
 
NodeType = 1, 2, 4, or 8
 
Data Type: DWORD
 
Specifies the mode of NetBIOS name resolution used by NetBIOS over
TCP/IP, where 1 = b-node, 2 = p-node, 4 = m-node, and 8 = h-node. This
value can be configured using DHCP. The default is 1 (b-node) if no
value is specified; if WINS servers are specified and NodeType is not,
the default is 8 (h-node).
 
PMTUBlackHoleDetect = 0 or 1
 
Data Type: DWORD
 
Specifies whether the stack will attempt to detect Maximum Transmission
Unit (MTU) routers that do not send back ICMP fragmentation-needed
messages. Setting this parameter when it is not needed can cause
performance degradation. The default is 0.
 
PMTUDiscovery = 0 or 1
 
Data Type: DWORD
 
Specifies whether Microsoft TCP/IP will attempt to perform path MTU
discovery as specified in RFC 1191. The default is 1.
 
RandomAdapter = 0 or 1
 
Data Type: DWORD
 
For a computer with multiple network adapters, specifies whether to
respond with an IP address selected randomly from the set of addresses
on the computer or whether to return the IP address of the adapter that
the request came in upon. The default is 0 (not random; that is, return
the address of the adapter that the request came in upon).
 
RoutingBufSize = 32-bit number
 
Data Type: DWORD
 
Specifies the total amount of buffer space to allocate for routing
packets. This parameter is ignored if EnableRouting=0. The default is
73,216.
 
RoutingPackets = 32-bit number
 
Data Type: DWORD
 
Specifies the maximum number of packets that can be routed
simultaneously. This parameter is ignored if EnableRouting=0. The
default is 50.
 
SessionKeepAlive = milliseconds
 
Data Type: DWORD
 
Specifies how often to send session keepalive packets on active
sessions. The minimum is 60 seconds. The default is 3600 seconds (1
hour).
 
SessionTableSize = integer
 
Data Type: DWORD
 
Specifies the maximum number of sessions in the NetBIOS session table.
The minimum allowable value is 1 and the maximum is 255. The default is
255.
 
SingleResponse = 0 or 1
 
Data Type: DWORD
 
For a computer with multiple network adapters, specifies whether to send
all IP addresses on a name query request from WINS. If this value is 1,
the system will send one address in a name query response; if 0, it will
return all the addresses of its adapters. The default is 0.
 
Size/Small/Medium/Large = 1, 2, or 3
 
Data Type: DWORD
 
Specifies how many buffers of various types to pre-allocate and the
maximum that can be allocated, where 1 = small, 2 = medium, and 3 =
large. The default is 1; the default is 3 if the WINS proxy is enabled.
 
This section describes variables for subkeys that appear in the
following registry key:
 
   Hkey_Local_Machine\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\VxD\MSTCP\
   ServiceProvider
 
The following keys describe the order used to resolve host names. A
lower number sets a higher priority for name resolution. These settings
are used for 16-bit Windows Sockets, which need to rely on the resolvers
that are expected to take the least time. The numbers indicate the
default values specified in Windows 95.
 
LocalPriority = 499
HostsPriority = 500
DNSPriority = 2000
NetbtPriority = 2001
 
For additional information about this functionality, please see the
following article(s) in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
 
   ARTICLE-ID: Q170619
   TITLE     : Windows 95 ServiceProvider Priority Values Not Applied
 
The entries in this section must be added to the following registry key,
where n represents the particular TCP/IP-to-network adapter binding.
 
   Hkey_Local_Machine\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\Class\netTrans\
   000n
 
MaxMTU = 16-bit integer
 
Data Type: String
 
Specifies the maximum size datagram IP that can pass to a media driver.
SNAP and source routing headers (if used on the media) are not included
in this value. For example, on an Ethernet network, MaxMTU will default
to 1500. The actual value used will be the minimum of the value
specified with this parameter and the size reported by the media driver.
The default is the size reported by the media driver.

If you need more as to TCP/IP changes and registry entries as well as initialization strings, let me know!
Dennis

0
 

Expert Comment

by:toolkool4u
ID: 1145277
if u had net medic u could see what is happening.
i'm sure if u use a modem your bandwith will jump around
if it's error correcting and compression enableded, software
or hardware enabled. it does not stay a constant speed!!!!!
telephone lines were not made with the internet in mind
they really do a bad job.u just do not have the software
to let u see what is happening
0
 

Expert Comment

by:toolkool4u
ID: 1145278
if u had net medic u could see what is happening.
i'm sure if u use a modem your bandwith will jump around
if it's error correcting and compression enableded, software
or hardware enabled. it does not stay a constant speed!!!!!
telephone lines were not made with the internet in mind
they really do a bad job.u just do not have the software
to let u see what is happening
0
 

Expert Comment

by:toolkool4u
ID: 1145279
if u had net medic u could see what is happening.
i'm sure if u use a modem your bandwith will jump around
if it's error correcting and compression enableded, software
or hardware enabled. it does not stay a constant speed!!!!!
telephone lines were not made with the internet in mind
they really do a bad job.u just do not have the software
to let u see what is happening
0
 

Expert Comment

by:toolkool4u
ID: 1145280
your modem does not stay at a constant speed....
if u had net medic or other software for your modem
u can see it, if it's error corecting and compression enabled
due to software are hardware ..  bandwith on a phone line
is just bad biz. most major phone lines were put there in
the 40s after the second world war  and we still use them
there still hooked up to the network.
0
 

Expert Comment

by:toolkool4u
ID: 1145281
your modem does not stay at a constant speed....
if u had net medic or other software for your modem
u can see it, if it's error corecting and compression enabled
due to software are hardware ..  bandwith on a phone line
is just bad biz. most major phone lines were put there in
the 40s after the second world war  and we still use them
there still hooked up to the network.
0

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