Keeping the page within a frame format

I'm building a website that uses a standard three(3) frameset mainpage set-up. The client wants to be sure that any page called up online opens within that main frameset. To clarify: If someone enters the site they will hit the "default.html" mainframeset (ie: banner,main and content pages) BUT (for example)if the http://www.main.htm address is entered, how can I tell, with HTML, "main.htm that it must open in the "mainframeset"default.html and not on its own full page? I hope this is not too confusing. Thanks for your excellent help in the past. I'm learning alot from this service!
graphicsAsked:
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bigelosCommented:
The default file that gets opened at any web site is index.htm or index.html, or variations of index.*.

So, if you want the "default" frameset to open up when someone accesses http://www.main.htm, have it specified in your index.html file.
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bigelosCommented:
There is no way to prevent the user from typing in the absolute URL and having it come up in a full page.

i.e. Take a look at
kanga.unixnet.org/~bigelos/temp/frames_no_bars

Compare that to
kanga.unixnet.org/~bigelos/temp/frames_no_bars/index.html

and also to
kanga.unixnet.org/~bigelos/temp/frames_no_bars/left.htm

There is no way I can prevent you from going to the last example with just html.  Maybe with HTML combined with a .htaccess file, or some cgi script that creates "on the fly" html could do it.

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graphicsAuthor Commented:
Windows nt uses "default.html" as the initial hit page.
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bigelosCommented:
I guess it really depends on your server, because I have a Windows NT based server, and it uses index.html as the initial hit page.  Are you interested in using your .htaccess file to limit whether or not the page can be viewed?  (I guess for a FrontPage server, it would be your #haccess file.)
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graphicsAuthor Commented:
I guess my only concern was that the pages should only be accessable through the frameset, this is because the way the client wants all the navigation set up. If someone brings up a page within the site, with out coming in through the mainpage,  there is no way for them to view anything else because there will be no links on the individual pages. If #haccess can help me there, I would very much like to know how to do it. Thanks for your responce, it is really appreciated!
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bigelosCommented:
In general, if that is your only concern, it is highly probable that anyone that can come in to your site and bypass your frames, etc., will be able to navigate your site anyways.  Usually people who get out of framesets do so by right-clicking on a link to "open page in new browser window", so the #haccess won't really work that good for them.  But, you can use it to stop others from linking to images, etc on your site.

First of all, what kind of server are you running (besides being NT based)?

I've only used htaccess, and only on a unix system, but it probably follows the same system.  That is:

a.)  You can restrict access to your site so that links have to come from a certain site.  If this site happens to be yours, then only you can link to pages in your site.  Basically, then, nobody will be able to directly type in the URL for a specific page on your site, unless they were already at your site.
b.)  It is also used for restricting access based on passwords.
c.)  Lastly, it is used for rejecting access from certain sites.

There is a good tutorial on it at
http://hoohoo.ncsa.uiuc.edu/docs/tutorials/user.html

and also some info at
http://www.teleport.com/support/webweave/htaccess.shtml
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graphicsAuthor Commented:
Thanks Bigelos! Great stuff, and I appreciate the tutourial link.
This is why I like expert exchange so much!
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