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Zip drives.

Posted on 1998-03-05
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Last Modified: 2013-12-15
what file system and /dev/ file do I use to setup zip drives?
jesse.laeuchli@usa.net
www.angelfire.com/biz/freestore/index.html
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Depends on the zip drive.  If you have an IDE zip drive, you
use the corresponding /dev/hd?? device (hd[a-d]#)  If its a
SCSI zip drive, you'll mount it as /dev/sd??.  Just treat it
like a hard drive.

The filesystem can be whatever you want it to be.  You can use
mke2fs to make ext2 partitions on those zip disks, or simply
mount -t msdos to access an existing preformatted one.
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