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Sharing CStrings and CMapStringToString in a 32 bit dll

I need to convert a dll that was writtin for 16bit Windows. It made use of the CString and CMapStringToString classes to hold an undefined number of dynamically created strings and shared those strings (and the CStringMap) between different executables.

Does anyone know how I can share the memory allocated by these objects, between different exes, in the 32bit world?
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AWF
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AWF
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stefanrCommented:
There is no easy way to share memory in the 32bit world. There is some ways though. You could use Memory Mapped Files (CreateFileMapping, OpenFileMapping, MapViewOfFile, UnmapViewOfFile). You could use a common DLL with a shared data segment (#pragma data_seg, not recommended though). A Named Pipe could be an alternative (or TCP/IP, NetBios, etc, if you prefer). Or the most difficult of all, ReadProcessMemory. I recommend reading "Advanced Windows" by Jeffrey Richter. He have excellent examples of most of these methods.

In any way, it seems that you by some means have to copy the contents of the memory in one process to the other (with the exception of ReadProcessMemory).

/Stefan
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stefanrCommented:
Correction: ReadProcessMemory copies the contents of the memory too.
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AWFAuthor Commented:
Thankyou for your response. I was afraid it wasnt going to be easy! Would an alternative be to write an out of process COM server? My understanding is that this would be perfrom quite slowly though
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stefanrCommented:
Personally I wouldn't worry so much about the performance as what parameters I am allowed to use when calling a DCOM server. Basically a DCOM server uses RPC which, by the way, is another way to share data between processes, even on other computers. However, you have to learn to use the MIDL compiler, and write .IDL files to use it. Using RPC would allow you to use any parameter for your functions, contrary to DCOM. You could easily fall into some traps (causing memory access violations, for example) if you are not careful with those parameters, though.

/Stefan
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