see if handle is valid ?

GetExitCodeThread(pReadingThread->m_hThread, &ExitCode);
 
when I use it as above, I sometimes crash as debugger tells:

pReadingThread      0x00dddb50 {CWinThread h=??? proc=???}

so how should I check if pReadingThread->m_hThread is
valid ?
hasAsked:
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nietodCommented:
There is no way to test if a thread handle is valid, but I suspect the problem is that pReadingThread is a bad pointer, not that pReadingThread->m_hThread is a bad handle.
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rayofunrealCommented:
Hi all...

Dear niethod, I think there is a function to do this. It is called GetHandleInformation(HANDLE hObj,DWORD* flg);
I don't know if it works with all handles, but I think yes. If no, reject me :-)
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nietodCommented:
That returns information about the object referenced by the handle.  It does work on all valid handles, but it does not test if a handle is valid.  I suspect that if you pass it a bad handle the results will probably be unpredicatable.  That is, it won't always returns an error.  You might want to test this, however.  Create and then destoy something and then test the handle with this procedure.  To be safe you need to do a bunch of tests under different circumstances.
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hasAuthor Commented:
gethandleinformation will fail too, but saving
pReadingThread->m_hThread to a variable when thread starts
then using it in getexitcodethread will work, as stefanr
suggests, so I will give the credit to him, when he answers
my question again here, thanks.
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alexoCommented:
There are APIs to check whether a memory block is valid.  Try the IsBad{something}Ptr() family of functions.  Ffor example, IsBadReadPtr().

First, check pReadingThread, then m_hThread (handles are actually pointers, as you can see in the windows include files).

A different approach can be using the Win32 Structured Exception Handling and catching the exception that crashes your program.  See the help.
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