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Solaris & Com settings

Posted on 1998-03-22
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Last Modified: 2013-12-16
Hi Sun Experts:
Can anyone provide me with any insight as to what files or service provides the transmission protocol settings--specifically--the parity, stopbits, and data bits
settings on a S-bus architecture Solaris Server?
   When dialing into the server from home--the terminal window with the Login Screen has extra x's and garbled-type
characters.
   This seems to be affecting our ppp service also--but as this affects our Login Screen on the terminal window--it is coming from some files or service other than just the ppp
files.

Thanks for your help--I have many angry users who have been waiting to use ppp on this server.
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Question by:lpaz
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Expert Comment

by:elfie
ID: 1812955
If all the text is garbled, it could be a baudrate problem.
 

As concerning the settings, normally i use 8 data-bits, no parity and 1 stop-bit.
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Author Comment

by:lpaz
ID: 1812956
Update:
In my original post, I made a mistake concerning the serial port
architecture of the server: it is not an S-Bus, it is instead the
old VME serial-bus architecture.

We have taken the modem off of the VME serial bus, and connected it directly to one of the serial ports, so it is working without
garbled characters now. But now, when we try to Login from home the login screen goes flying by very fast, and we are left at the
password: prompt. Our users then have to press Return before they get the normal Login screen.

So, we still seem to have some sort of mismatch on the baudrate, although the parity settings seem to work now. We normally use
the 8N1 settings on the client pc's, but my question is what
file on the Sun Server, running Solaris 2.5.1, sets or controls
this?

As it still is not working quite correctly, I would like to be able to get it working as it should, without the users having to press enter or return to get to the login screen?
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Expert Comment

by:elfie
ID: 1812957
Isn't it set in the /etc/inittab. Somewhere the process is defined that controls the modem port.
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Author Comment

by:lpaz
ID: 1812958
Thanks for the info. I will check out the /etc/inittab file. I
realize Solaris is a little different than most of the Unix variant's, so the process may be a little different.
Someone on a usenet suggested looking at the /etc/ttydefs file, so I guess I will start looking at the /etc directory.

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Accepted Solution

by:
jclf earned 200 total points
ID: 1812959
/etc/ttydefs is the place. It's almost 4 years since I did this! For the device configured as your PPP interface, you'll need the stty settings - probably "-parity -cstopb crtscts raw", and start at the top speed and work down in the loop. Check out man ttydefs for details.

Or find an old Livingston Portmaster from somewhere. A snap to configure, and provides easy expansion.
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