Reloading registry without restart.

Is it possible to reload the win 95 registry without restarting windows?
I need to do this from a script or a program.
This in order for the changes made to the registry by another program to take effect.
Thanks,
-jonie.
jonieAsked:
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busukaCommented:
Sorry, but AFAIK answer is no. It's caused by:
registry changes may be too complex and can include changes of
paths and parameters of background tasks and drivers.
Answer: you MUST restart Win95.
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dew_associatesCommented:
Jonie, please tell us more about what your trying to accomplish and maybe there's a way aorund the problem.
Dennis
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smeebudCommented:
jonie,
You can refresh your registry by "Shutdown" calling for CTRL+ALT+DEL and choose explorer, end task. Windows needs explorer to shutdown, hence it can't. So it re-reads the registry as if it where shutting down thhu updating.
Not my favorate thing to do but it works.
You can use PWSHUT utility to do this.
PWSHUT.ZIP
Check out Pwshut.zip at http://www.winmag.com./ 
Run Programs and cleanup tasks at Shut Down
This program automatically detects attempts to shutdown Windows 95.  It then
postpones the shutdown and runs all programs found in the \Windows\Shutdown
folder.  Once the programs in the Shutdown group have finished, the
shutdown of Windows proceeds.

I know you recognize this Dennis:))

If you like this answer better than the 1st, You have the option to reject the standing answer and I'll post this one.
Thry the "End Task" on explorer 1st.
See how your system like it.
Some 95's don't like it.

Regards,
bud
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busukaCommented:
Hmm, smth. new for me. You know Bud, when I played with Win95 after it was released,
I pressed Ctrl-Alt-Del and successefully closed all tasks INCLUDE Explorer. So, it was
funny to see empty screen with just moving mouse. Another attept brought blue screen
that "... not responding, press any key to return to Win and wait or Ctrl-Alt-Del to reboot".
Not needed to say that "three finger salute" was useless as well. After this I stopped
playing with Win95.

Anyway, jonie absolutely free to reject my answer and try your suggestion, but I doubt
that it's better than just reboot Win95.

Regards, Ian
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smeebudCommented:
Ian,
Like I said above, some 95's like it, and some don't. I'm sure you know how individualistic
95 is.
That's why I said for jonie to try it first.
As far as doing it all at once, i've seen that cause problems.
Best thing that I know, if one were going to use that method is to close everything 1st secept explorer. Then wait..............harddrive activity while the buffers, and swapfile get clean, then close explorer.

It's just one of those ongoing "Great debates" about 95

Later Ian and jonie
Bud
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jonieAuthor Commented:
Hi guys, and thanks for your comments.
None of your propositions is quite what I was looking for, though.
Yes, I've also been messing around with win95, Ctrl-Alt-Del and closing all programs.
But, let me give you some background on my problem, as dew_associates suggested:
I need to run a win95-program for which the sDecimal-setting in the Registry is critical. So, I change the sDecimal value with a registry script, but the changes does not take effect in win95 (as they do in NT) without restarting. So, I need this same program that changes the sDecimal value also to reload the Registry, without any interaction by the user.
Of course this can be done with that usual "You need to restart your computer for the changes to take effect. Restart now? YES/NO", but I'm looking for a more elegant way.
Well, it would seem logical that this is not possible, since so many programs need to restart windows after being installed, and one would think that they would use this reload-registry feature, if there was one.
Yours,
jonie
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busukaCommented:
OK. Smeebud was close. This is EXACT way how:

How to reload the Registry Without having to reboot the whole system: Once you have made changes to the registry that are
              needed select Explorer in the close program and say "End Task" once it asks to shut down say "no" and wait it will then pop up that it
              is not responding say end task and your computer is refreshed without having to restart the whole computer.
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busukaCommented:
Oops, meant to Comment. Sorry.
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smeebudCommented:
jonie,
Why can't you leave the registry setting as permanent??
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dew_associatesCommented:
Jonie, a large portion of the registry in Win95 is dynamic, unlike NT. There's no method in Windows to start and stop services are there are in NT, thus a restart!

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smeebudCommented:
busuka,
I tryed your suggestion

[vcache]
MaxFileCache=8192

Much better. Thanks.

Please email me and explain thatto me please.
Theres a raging debate over these settings on the newsgroups.

smeebud@gte.net
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