Sample .login and .cshrc for tcsh

Hey all,
      I would like to know if there is a "general" or typical .login and .cshrc I can take and modify for use
on my school (system 5) unix account.  I am currently in a ksh., and want to upgrade to the tcsh.
                                                                                  thanks in advance,  
                                                                                  gs01web@panther.gsu.edu
                                                                                   Evan
evheadAsked:
Who is Participating?
I wear a lot of hats...

"The solutions and answers provided on Experts Exchange have been extremely helpful to me over the last few years. I wear a lot of hats - Developer, Database Administrator, Help Desk, etc., so I know a lot of things but not a lot about one thing. Experts Exchange gives me answers from people who do know a lot about one thing, in a easy to use platform." -Todd S.

rbrCommented:
1.) .login
# This is the default standard .login provided to csh users.
# They are expected to edit it to meet their own needs.
#
# The commands in this file are executed when a csh user first
# logs in.  This file is processed after .cshrc.
#
# $Revision: 1.8 $
#

# Set the interrupt character to Ctrl-c and do clean backspacing.
alias l ls -la
alias rm rm -i
alias del rm -i
alias alld "'rm'"
alias mail Mail
alias wipe "'rm' -r"

if (-t 0) then
    stty intr '^C' echoe
endif

# Set the TERM environment variable
eval `tset -s -Q`

# Set the default X server.
if ($?DISPLAY == 0) then
    if ($?REMOTEHOST) then
        setenv DISPLAY ${REMOTEHOST}:0
    else
        setenv DISPLAY :0
    endif
endif
umask 77
alld $home/.spooler/* > /dev/null
alld $home/tmp/* > /dev/null
alld $home/usr/* > /dev/null
alld -r .netscape/cache/*
alld .netscape-cache/*
setenv TERM vt100


2.) .cshrc
# This is the default standard .cshrc provided to csh users.
# They are expected to edit it to meet their own needs.
#
# The commands in this file are executed each time a new csh shell
# is started.
#
# $Revision: 1.6 $
#

# list directories in columns
alias ls 'ls -C'

# Remember last 100 commands
set history = 100

# For interactive shells, set the prompt to show the host name and event number.
if ( $?prompt ) then
        if ( -o /bin/su ) then
                set prompt="`hostname -s` \!# "
        else
                set prompt="`hostname -s` \!% "
        endif
endif
setenv PRINTER tp_b
setenv TMPDIR ~/tmp
set path = (/usr/etc $home/work/cmd $home/work/tsk $home/tools /usr/local/bin $path)
0

Experts Exchange Solution brought to you by

Your issues matter to us.

Facing a tech roadblock? Get the help and guidance you need from experienced professionals who care. Ask your question anytime, anywhere, with no hassle.

Start your 7-day free trial
braveheartCommented:
Hmm. I think that upgrading from the ksh to the tcsh is an oxymoron. However...

There is no such thing as typical initialisation files but maybe a few guiding principles will help you.

Remember that .cshrc is executed every time you start up a new C shell, whether that is by typing csh at the command line, logging in, or executing a csh command script. Of course you can avoid executing .cshrc in a script by starting it with:
#!/bin/csh -f
where -f means fast.

The .login file is executed once per login session at an interactive terminal, *after* .cshrc, which I always find illogical.

Environment variables are inherited from parent shells but aliases are not, so...

you should initialise terminal control characters, prompts, default file access and maybe some environment variables in your .login file but aliases should be initialised in .cshrc.

You might like to set your prompt so that it contains useful information such as the current directory, or history number, or username (if you use different ones), or hostname (if you use different ones).

Try "man csh" and "man tcsh" for more information.

If you are working in an X oriented environment, you may have a file that is executed once for every session and not per login. This may be called .xsession (or something similar) but this is not standardised between different flavours of UNIX. There are also lots of different ways of initialising X. .xinitrc is another one.
0
It's more than this solution.Get answers and train to solve all your tech problems - anytime, anywhere.Try it for free Edge Out The Competitionfor your dream job with proven skills and certifications.Get started today Stand Outas the employee with proven skills.Start learning today for free Move Your Career Forwardwith certification training in the latest technologies.Start your trial today
Unix OS

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.